Culture

Why Clint Eastwood's Anti-PC Rant Matters

The Democrats recently threw every celebrity they could at America to convince us to vote for Hillary Clinton.

Meryl Streep. Elizabeth Banks. Lena Dunham. America Ferrera. Katy Perry. Chloe Grace Moretz. Tony Goldwyn. They all spoke at last month’s Democratic National Convention on Clinton’s behalf.

None could compare to Clint Eastwood. Again.

No, the “Man with No Name” didn’t appear at the Republican National Convention like he did four years ago. That “empty chair” speech rocked the country, even as political pundits did all they could to mock it.

This time, Eastwood used a simple celebrity profile to make a statement. It easily eclipsed anything Streep and co. had to offer.

The Oscar winner put Donald Trump’s rise in context, slamming our current thought police culture in ways few stars dare.

…because secretly everybody’s getting tired of political correctness, kissing up. That’s the kiss-ass generation we’re in right now. We’re really in a p***** generation. Everybody’s walking on eggshells. We see people accusing people of being racist and all kinds of stuff. When I grew up, those things weren’t called racist. And then when I did Gran Torino, even my associate said, “This is a really good script, but it’s politically incorrect.” And I said, “Good. Let me read it tonight.” The next morning, I came in and I threw it on his desk and I said, “We’re starting this immediately.”

He wasn’t done. He defended Trump, to a point, regarding accusations of racism.

You know, he’s a racist now because he’s talked about this judge. And yeah, it’s a dumb thing to say. I mean, to predicate your opinion on the fact that the guy was born to Mexican parents or something. He’s said a lot of dumb things. So have all of them. Both sides. But everybody—the press and everybody’s going, “Oh, well, that’s racist,” and they’re making a big hoodoo out of it. Just f***ing get over it. It’s a sad time in history.

In our culture, the Race Card is played with alacrity. Rather than judging folks by their actions, we slam them for speaking incorrectly, or even sharing an unpopular view.

Or saying something just plain dumb, to paraphrase Eastwood.

The usual suspects are gnashing their teeth over the actor’s comments. He’s a racist, too, they suggest, ignoring a lifetime of work that says otherwise.

Eastwood’s comments echo the sentiments, and staying power, of another anti-PC rant. Last year, Jerry Seinfeld tore into today’s college culture, saying students simply can’t take a joke.

When the cleanest comic around complains about PC rules, you know it’s an issue. That’s why Seinfeld’s comments rocked us.

The same is happening again thanks to Eastwood. We may live in a PC age, but enough people understand those rules deserve to be ridiculed.

It took Dirty Harry to remind us of that.