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by
Rick Moran

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May 31, 2014 - 7:21 am

OK boys and girls — Let’s all join hands, count to three, and jump off the cliff together.

 

Nobody will ever accuse John Boehner of having political courage — or possessing excess intelligence. Why now? What’s the rush?

Allahpundit
is as disgusted as anyone:

Outrageous. Not the fact that the House leadership wants to do something on immigration; that’s been common knowledge for 18 months. What’s outrageous is the timing, which, if this AP report is accurate, would confirm our most cynical suspicions about just how gutless and unaccountable Republicans are on this issue. I remember critics predicting last year that Boehner wouldn’t bring something to the floor before the House primaries for fear that a backlash among conservative voters would knock out a bunch of incumbents. He’d wait until just after the primaries had ended to do it, so that conservatives would be powerless to exert any influence over the process.

So the timid, scaredy-cat Republicans didn’t want a vote on immigration reform until their sinecure was secure and they didn’t have to face angry conservatives who might have primaried them.

Profiles of a jellyfish.

Businessweek gives the real reason Boehner is hesitating:

Some reformers had hoped that Boehner would find a way around the anti-immigration conservatives in his caucus—that even as he appeased them by denouncing the Senate bill, he would arrange to make it a fait accompli through legislative maneuvering. In January, Boehner issued a “framework” to legalize undocumented workers that might have smoothed the path to legislation, but conservatives quickly beat it back.

To maintain an appearance of working toward reform even as they reject the Senate’s comprehensive approach, various House Committees have passed narrowly targeted bills.

Modest though they may be, such a bill could theoretically serve as a vehicle for more ambitious reform. Were the House to pass it, a House-Senate conference committee assembled to reconcile the two bills could—if it were stacked with reform supporters—produce something that very closely resembles the Senate’s bill. “I think that moving in a piece-by-piece fashion on this in a common-sense way is the way to do this,” Boehner said on May 22. Yet so far he has refused to allow the House even to vote on these narrow Republican measures.
Story: An Immigration Deal Worth Reaching

Reformers are clinging to one final possibility: When the primaries are finished and Republican members no longer face the immediate prospect of being unseated by a challenge from their right, they’ll act quickly to address their party’s problems with Hispanics. But that hope is hard to square with how these primary races are unfolding. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, who claims to support reform and faces a June 10 primary, recently sent out a campaign flier boasting that he “is stopping the Obama-Reid plan to give illegal aliens amnesty.”

Boehner is likely to lose his speakership if immigration reform passes. At the very least, millions of conservatives would stay home  on election day if he’s stupid enough to bring the bills to the floor.

While the GOP approach is sound — carefully targeted reforms of a broken system with strong enforcement provisions — the problem is that any conference committee with the Senate is likely to end up with a final package looking an awful lot like the execrable “comprehensive reform” passed by the upper body last year. That makes any vote on immigration reform in the House an invitation to force a vote on the Senate bill.

What is the problem with waiting until next year when there’s a good chance the GOP will control both houses of Congress, and won’t have to worry about “amnesty?” The Republican’s piecemeal approach to reform — prudent, realistic, and popular — is a far better alternative than passing a fatally flawed Senate bill that no one expects the Obama administration to honor the enforcement provisions. A GOP bill could put real teeth into those provisions, making it far more difficult for the administration to weasel out of their responsibilities to secure the border.

it’s a canard to say that the passage of an immigration reform bill will attract any Hispanic votes. Reform supporters repeat it like a mantra despite the fact there is zero evidence that Hispanics will begin a love affair with the Republican party if immigration reform is passed. The president, the Democrats, and the press will all see to it that the GOP will get no credit for the bill’s passage, and all the blame for the delay.

The Republicans are about to commit hari-kari and John Boehner is handing them the sword.

Rick Moran is PJ Media's Chicago editor and Blog editor at The American Thinker. He is also host of the"RINO Hour of Power" on Blog Talk Radio. His own blog is Right Wing Nut House.
Top Rated Comments   
The problem with immigration reform is that it has nothing to do with immigration and has no intent to reform anything.

Border crashing isn't immigration. Home invasion isn't house hunting. Auto theft isn't car shopping. And identity theft isn't a petition for a name change.

Unless and until Hispanics announce an intent to broadly support crushing the Woodstock Party, it is self-defeating to pander to someone who is going to stab you in the back the minute they get the fruits of your supplication.

And what, precisely, is going to be "reformed". You can't "reform" a criminal act. 15 million home invaders spurs a "reform" movement...future home invaders have to use safety ladders and wear non-latex gloves?

Identity thieves have to check FICO score reports for rolling lates?

Auto thieves have to check tire air pressure?

Inane becomes insane with just the change of one letter. I'm all for immigration.

Come to the front door and ring the bell.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Madness.

It isn’t about attracting Hispanics. Oh, that’s what all the beltway-types keep saying, but as stated above…there’s absolutely no evidence that “immigration reform” will accomplish that goal – and would probably just add Democrat voters.

It’s about money. Businesses want cheap labor and many billionaire donors are ideologically neutral and donate purely for self-interest…whether the policy is good for the country is irrelevant.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (14)
All Comments   (14)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Americans might be open to an immigration reform bill if describing illegal immigrants by their proper label, "Criminal Trespassers" is in the first sentence of the bill.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Anti-immigration conservatives"?

FOAD Businessweek.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Everything about this post seems spot on…including the relative merit of the GOP immigration plan (I still think a path to citizenship could be acceptable as long as a reasonable system is in place first with proper measurable metrics making a future amnesty unlikely…but that’s not going to happen with a Democratic Senate and the Very Special Halfwit we have as President).

One minor quibble...it's not the base or conservatives that don’t want this...it's "Voters". No one thinks this is important right now...it's always at the bottom when polling for important issues...across the board. Pushing this doesn't just cause volcanic anger in the base. The amnesty-first approach causes volcanic anger in the non-base, too. But they think they can win an election with voters that are neither conservatives nor not-conservatives…I’m not sure how that works.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
An enforcement-first amnesty bill (something like the amnesty provisions would only kick in after a super-majority of both houses certified the border as secured and immigration enforcement was effective) would have strong political benefits for the GOP. If it passes they get credit with Hispanic voters - it might not be enough to offset their cultural proclivities toward socialism, but it would help - and it pushes back against the idea that the GOP is hostile to minorities. If it doesn't pass it'll be because the Democrats blocked it in the Senate or because Obama vetoed it which will depress Hispanic enthusiasm for the Democrats heading into 2016.

Boehner has repeated demonstrated he lacks the strategic mindset necessary to be Speaker.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
In the long run, no matter how you try; you cannot keep someone from committing suicide if they are determined to do so. Even if you have them institutionalized, they have time, will, and will find an opportunity.

John Boehner and the Institutional Republican Party is determined to commit suicide, even after the Base of the party has tried to stop them. The success of the suicide effort does not reflect or implicate those who tried to prevent it. It is not like it is a surprise. The only thing to do is to plan to move on. What will be the next course of action for Patriots? We cannot hold any of the Three Branches of government, as the Institutionals are intent on pandering to the Democrats. In the face of a 3 Branch dictatorship of the Left, are electoral politics even feasible or germane anymore? And if they are not, what responses; fight or flight, remain open?

The Institutional Republicans have long been TWANLOC. They will do what they are going to do. And those of us who aren't Institutional Republicans will, perforce, do what we are going to do.

Subotai Bahadur
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Boehner and the other "establishment" RINO types are desperate for Amnesty because their lords and masters in the Chamber of Commerce want cheap labor.

Boehner and his cohorts are either too stupid to see how it will put the Democrats permanently in charge of government...or they don't care.

Everyone has been calling for Shinseki to resign...I think John Boehner & Eric Cantor have to go.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Never mind the primaries and delaying the immigration reform until afterwards.
Any attempt to pull a Boehner will result in the Democrats taking control of the House again as "Republicans" will stay home. And why shouldn't we? We have no control over the Republican House and the best protest, given that our options have been reduced, is no protest at all. Just stay home. The hell with them. And have Boehner and Cantor try to explain why they no longer are in power. Fuc' em! By the way Moran, this was an accurate read of what's going on.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
They are "in power" as long as they hold office. They were perfectly happy for 40 years slurping at the far end of the trough.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
The problem with immigration reform is that it has nothing to do with immigration and has no intent to reform anything.

Border crashing isn't immigration. Home invasion isn't house hunting. Auto theft isn't car shopping. And identity theft isn't a petition for a name change.

Unless and until Hispanics announce an intent to broadly support crushing the Woodstock Party, it is self-defeating to pander to someone who is going to stab you in the back the minute they get the fruits of your supplication.

And what, precisely, is going to be "reformed". You can't "reform" a criminal act. 15 million home invaders spurs a "reform" movement...future home invaders have to use safety ladders and wear non-latex gloves?

Identity thieves have to check FICO score reports for rolling lates?

Auto thieves have to check tire air pressure?

Inane becomes insane with just the change of one letter. I'm all for immigration.

Come to the front door and ring the bell.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
We have a president who will not enforce current laws, why pass new ones?
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why not just leave amnesty out of it and pass a bill cutting off the sugar while mandating government agencies join in the enforcement effort (EVerify) as we do small pizza shops?

Then once he gets his bona fides quasi-reestablished he can then address cutting slack to those here illegally that have shown themselves to be responsible members of the community.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
Madness.

It isn’t about attracting Hispanics. Oh, that’s what all the beltway-types keep saying, but as stated above…there’s absolutely no evidence that “immigration reform” will accomplish that goal – and would probably just add Democrat voters.

It’s about money. Businesses want cheap labor and many billionaire donors are ideologically neutral and donate purely for self-interest…whether the policy is good for the country is irrelevant.
12 weeks ago
12 weeks ago Link To Comment
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