Get PJ Media on your Apple

The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

Bio

March 17, 2014 - 11:37 am

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is still missing under unknown circumstances, yet Congress has already come up with responsive legislation.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y) today introduced the Transnational Regulation of Identity of Passports (TRIP) Act of 2014, which would remove countries from the U.S. visa waiver program if they don’t begin checking passports against Interpol’s Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) database within five years.

Only the United States, the United Kingdom, and the United Arab Emirates regularly check passports against the database, and only 20 of Interpol’s 190 member nations even used the database in 2013.

Wielding a photo of the two Iranians who boarded the missing flight using stolen passports, Schumer told reporters Sunday “there is absolutely no reason why we shouldn’t put pressure on other countries” to use the Interpol database.

“It is shocking to me that in the post-9/11 era, when we have seen how much damage just a few bad individuals can cause, that countries would choose not to ensure that the people who are flying in and out of their country are actually who they say they are,” Schumer said.

Today, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) joined as a co-sponsor, stressing, “We don’t know whether the two travelers on the missing Malaysian jet were the cause of its disappearance, but certainly they should have been stopped at the gate.”

“This simple, straightforward, system has the capacity to save lives and spare millions from worry. Whether air travelers are flying at home or abroad, they deserve the peace of mind that law enforcement is taking all necessary and available steps to ensure their safety and security,” Blumenthal said in a statement. “This measure would effectively compel use of the data base of stolen or lost passports by denying temporary visas to citizens of any country that fails to do so.”

Along with affecting visa waivers five years from passage, the TRIP Act would “deny tourist and business visas to citizens of any country that has not made progress in implementing infrastructure to screen passengers against the STLD database within ten years of passage.”

Thirty-seven countries are currently within the program, which allows entry without a visa for up to 90 days. Malaysia is not included in the program.

“Any country refusing to use Interpol’s data base of stolen or lost identity documents is inexcusably endangering our citizens as well as their own,” Blumenthal said. “This law send a message to all countries: use the data base, or your citizens will be denied temporary visas to visit here. That’s the kind of incentive sure to get them to screen travelers using stolen paper.”

Bridget Johnson is a veteran journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She is an NPR contributor and has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (10)
All Comments   (10)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
my friend's mom makes $65 /hr on the computer . She has been out of a job for ten months but last month her payment was $15817 just working on the computer for a few hours. find more information ............... www.jobsur.commy friend's mom makes $65 /hr on the computer . She has been out of a job for ten months but last month her payment was $15817 just working on the computer for a few hours. find more information ............... www.jobsur.com
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
Ah, yes. The cry of "There ought to be a law." The inevitable outpouring of the "Don't confuse me with facts; I've made up my mind!" crowd. And while we're at it, let's set as the gold standard of criminal detection an agency that historically ranks near the very bottom for its ability to deal successfully with criminals.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
Good for comrade Chuckie. What we all need now is more government interference in our flying travel arrangements, including guesswork as to our intentions whenever we're up against a genius of a TSA agent with a chip on its shoulder, like most of them.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
The self importance of these people is just staggering.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
Er. yeah, but, Chucky Cheese, what's checking with the Interpol data base have to do with a pilot in charge of the flight deck who's a "political fanatic," "religious," who's wife and kids just left him the day before the flight, and apparently who is upset over his favorite Muslim Brotherhood enabling politician's suffering over a trumped up criminal prosecution and conviction for indulging in "gay sex?" Would any of those "identifying factors" or "profiles" have qualified as "wanted hits" or BOLs in the Interpol data base?
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
O.K. Chucky et al ... Are we prepared to lead the way on that one? Put your money where yer mouth is moron and demand the same from this administration. We've twisted ourselves into pretzels trying to avoid the words terrorist, Muslim, Islam, jihad, and a host of other dumbass things.
Let's get with it and get real ... we have enemies both within and without; and it doesn't help one iota if you go running around making new laws and castigating other countries for not applying existing laws; when we ourselves have a POTUS who sets a totally lawless precedent!!!!!! C'mon!!!!!!!
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
I thought we banned bossy.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
What could go wrong in a single payer secure database? Let's legislate against the bad guys and go back to sleep. Sounds like it's time to raise the minimum wage around the world for unionized airport security, and have the UN upgrade terrorist software to include everyone.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
I can get behind that, no matter who sponsors it, except for one thing: why wait a decade before the proposed law is enforced? Surely it won't take that long to get the technology in place.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
There he is: Chucky Schumer, king of the Monday Morning Quarterback club. No one can find legislation to match the problem the way Chucky can.
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All