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The PJ Tatler

by
Bryan Preston

Bio

January 30, 2014 - 2:35 pm

So the other night, this would be Tuesday while the majority of the Texas political press were locked out, the Wendy Davis campaign thought it would be a good idea to make their candidate look more “badass.”

This is the unfortunate result.

davis-shotgun1

 

davis-shotgun2

 

Holding a firearm and looking good isn’t generally a difficult thing to do.

Say what want about Ann Richards, and I was certainly no fan, but at least she knew how to hold a shotgun without looking silly. She looks pretty beast here. She looks like someone who brought down a few birds in her time.

ann-richards-shotgun

Sarah Palin has no trouble pulling off the effective shotgun shot.

palin-shotgun

Greg Abbott also had no trouble with it on this Texas Monthly cover.

abbott-shotgun

Wendy Davis, on the other hand, joins fellow Democrats whose photo ops that were intended to make them look cool, didn’t.

dukakis-davis

 

Kerry-Bunny-Suit

Bryan Preston has been a leading conservative blogger and opinionator since founding his first blog in 2001. Bryan is a military veteran, worked for NASA, was a founding blogger and producer at Hot Air, was producer of the Laura Ingraham Show and, most recently before joining PJM, was Communications Director of the Republican Party of Texas.

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Top Rated Comments   
She looks as if she's worried that the shotgun might just go ahead and start randomly shooting people. All by itself. Like all "assault shotguns" do.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
No, Wendy has obviously no knowledge of guns, and she was not the one to open the action. Look at the fingers of her right hand. This is not the way someone comfortable with firearms holds a gun. Also she seems to be attempting to hold the weapon with both hands as though the action was closed and locked; it's not. If someone has personally checked the breech, and determined there are no cartridges chambered, there is no need to keep the action open. Davis apparently does not know this.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
OMG.... how sadly awkward.

The poor thing has no clue how to handle that firearm and I'd really like to know what genius thought handing a novice a firearm in a crowded banquet room was a great photo op. I teach firearms disciplines to 8 year olds who don't look that uncomfortable at the end of their first 2 hour lesson.

Between her playing the "Texas gal" card (something that would land any man in deep stink) and this stunt, I can only think these are genius ideas by the out of staters with OfAs Battleground Texas to give Wendy a good ole girl makeover.

Not a good way to try to impress Texas women who really do work hard for a living and handle firearms regularly!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (25)
All Comments   (25)
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If I may, and apologies to Gridley...
I've been taught in many settings that you keep the action on a firearm open unless you need it ready to shoot, or perhaps in storage. In the images above, other than Mrs. Palin firing, the action should be open. All the more when the firearm is over the shoulder and nearly level, Mr. Abbott -- highly questionable muzzle control.
Mrs. Davis -- how odd that she divorced but kept her second ex's name -- looks as comfortable as W.C. Fields holding a baby. People who dislike firearms should choose other props.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I agree on Abbott's photo and wouldn't have approved it's printing. There's too many cool ways to do that image with better results, even then, his body language conveys that he is clearly comfortable handling his firearm from a wheelchair which creates its own challenges.

The best marks I can give it are that it was obviously taken on a closed control set. There is no such thing as an unloaded firearm.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
No apologies necessary. In fact, I've been taught the same thing; It is a matter of courtesy to anyone present who has not had an opportunity to inspect the breech of the firearm.

But when posing with a break-action firearm, it's only necessary that you personally inspect the breech to make sure there is no cartridge present. You may then close the action, and hold the weapon in a more natural stance. If you are going to use a firearm as a prop, it only makes sense.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Mebbe she thought it was "The Slow Joe B Magic Pre-Twenty Week Abortion Tool"....
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Well, at least she hasn't got her finger on the trigger, and isn't pointing it at anyone....


Hey, gotta give somebody some credit.....

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'd argue your second point..... those venues are crawling with people in the backstage, side stages.... even up in the air on the riggings.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Halloween politics. Time to put the costumes on and pretend to be somebody else.

It lasts a few months every two years.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
What genius? Same genius that has been thinking up all of the moronic actions by that campaign.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Good lord, she looks like an idiot.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Well, there's a reason for that, Robin.

;-)

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Chuck Heston kept his shotgun broken, even when he shouldered it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
No he didn't. "Shouldering" a shotgun means bringing the butt up to one's shoulder, as in aiming, and preparing to fire it.

But Charlton Heston was often pictured carrying a double barrel shotgun draped over one shoulder with the action broken open. That's a different matter than "shouldering" a shotgun.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
And holding it broken open is common practice among real shotgunners.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Yes, it certainly is.

But not in the manner Miss Wendy is holding the shotgun in the two pictures of her. I suspect these were posed by a photographer who was also not familiar with the way real shotgunners normally hold shotguns.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
She's got such a way with that gun, just like Hugh Laurie with the baby in Sense and Sensibility :-)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
She looks as if she's worried that the shotgun might just go ahead and start randomly shooting people. All by itself. Like all "assault shotguns" do.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
You forgot BHO's pansy bike helmet and first pitch photos.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I don't like Wendy or her politics, but how is her grip awkward? She's broken open the breech to show the gun at least can't be fired, if it's not in fact unloaded. It's a very appropriate way to hold a shotgun on a stage in front of a group of people, it seems to me. Especially in this day of mass shootings. The other gun pictures are outdoors (Palin and Richards) or solo posed (Abbott) for a photographer.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
First clue is body language. People who regularly handle firearms of any kind have a very natural and comfortable body language.

Notice that the shotgun is being held high at chest level, her stance is flat to the audience placing the firearm across her front and she is holding away from her body. Her right hand is wrapped awkwardly around the trigger area and her left hand is seated.... I can't even describe it, but it's just completely wrong. If I were being picky, I'd also take issue with her wearing her heels which puts her on unstable footing.

A break barrel is a fairly heavy fire arm. A person who regularly handles break barrels would automatically keep it around waist level, securely tight to the body and under the outside arm with the hand kept back by the grip and away from the trigger mechanism. Your body is in more of a protective angle and the barrel is kept pointed towards the floor. Your other closed hand normally provides a solid support - usually over the barrel. It's difficult to describe, but if I posted a pic of one of my kiddos next to this one, the differences immediately appear. She should also be wearing sturdy closed toed shoes - not heels or stockings feet.

In the meantime.... An open breach or a firearm that was inspected by someone else means nothing. There is no such thing as an unloaded firearm. Many older break barrels are notoriously "loose" and close quite easily. I would be willing to challenge the idea that her barrel was in a safe direction or that this was a safe demonstration since venues like this are usually crawling with all kinds of people in the back and side stages and behind curtains that can't be seen.

Lastly, her attention and focus are not on the prop in her hands, but she's looking around the room mugging for the cameras. Sadly, Obama's "fake pic" was a lot better than this one.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
No, Wendy has obviously no knowledge of guns, and she was not the one to open the action. Look at the fingers of her right hand. This is not the way someone comfortable with firearms holds a gun. Also she seems to be attempting to hold the weapon with both hands as though the action was closed and locked; it's not. If someone has personally checked the breech, and determined there are no cartridges chambered, there is no need to keep the action open. Davis apparently does not know this.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
At our cowboy club, she'd be expected to hold the gun more-or-less at present arms and with the action open so that the muzzles would point up. In my case, that would mean right hand on the pistol grip, finger outside the trigger guard, left hand on the forearm. Our club is very, very big on "muzzles up."
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The only reason I would disagree with Present Arms is that you've got a highly contrived interior set up. Lots of non-fixed and unstable theatrical lighting and trusses, if it's a ballroom you've got lots of chandeliers or other lighting fixtures. And the very real possibility that a worker might be climbing up in those trusses.

Heck.... I couldn't even guarantee that there aren't people under that stage.

I really would be hard pressed to identify a "safe direction" with reasonable certainty in this set up. Therefore, if I were in control, the firearm would never have left its case.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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