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Martin Luther King Is Weeping in His Grave

Commemorating the 50-year anniversary of the March on Washington with fearmongering and demagoguery.

by
Rick Moran

Bio

August 24, 2013 - 1:47 pm

Fifty years ago this week, Martin Luther King stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and told a quarter of a million people of his dream of an American future where race didn’t matter in judging your fellow man, only the content of his character.

King, who spent most of his life as a Republican, never imagined that his descendents in the civil rights movement would make every effort to ensure that race would become the only thing that mattered and that one’s character was judged by politics, and not on any moral basis that King would have recognized.

Partisanship made a rude intrusion on a ceremony marking the “March on Washington” that the civil rights icon led. It could be seen as inevitable, given the fractured, dysfunctional nature of our politics, that the solemnity that should attend such an occasion was shattered by venomous lies and wildly exaggerated hyperbole, making a mockery of King’s message. It was the kind of politics that King, a political genius, didn’t need to practice. He had an unerring sense of the moral authority of the message he was bringing and the ability to project powerful images of sin and redemption that were compelling enough to literally move millions of people to change the country.

Not so today. Instead of moral truths, we got political lies. Instead of a spirit of tolerance, we got fearmongering and demagoguery.

Rep. John L. Lewis, a genuine hero of the movement who endured the dogs, the water cannons, the billy clubs, and the hate of southern authorities, paying for his activism by shedding blood for the cause, brought himself down to gutter level when he told the crowd at the memorial, “I am not going to stand by and let the Supreme Court take the right to vote away from us!”

You cannot stand by. You cannot sit down. You have to stand up, speak up, speak out and get in the way. Make some noise. The vote is precious. It is almost sacred. It’s the most powerful non-violent tool we have in a democratic society and we’ve got to use it. Back in 1963 we didn’t have a cellular telephone, iPad, iPod, but we used what we had to bring about a non-violent revolution. And I said to all of the young people, you must get out there and push and pull and make America what America should be for all of us. We must say to the Congress, “Fix the Voting Rights Act.”

Accusing the Supreme Court of taking the right to vote away from anyone is a lie. Lewis knows full well that’s not what the Supreme Court ruled when they abolished the section of the Voting Rights Act that allowed the federal government to oversee some states’ voting laws.

But the object here isn’t to inform, but to instill fear. Only those besotted with partisanship would claim that the court’s purpose is to prevent people from voting. It’s utter nonsense.

Lewis got it right when he claimed the vote is “almost sacred.” But if that were true, why fight tooth and nail to prevent that sacred event from being hijacked by fraud? I agree that there are many Republicans who do the cause of voter ID no good by claiming massive voter fraud as a reason for voter ID laws. The point isn’t the numbers of fraudulent votes, it’s the integrity of the ballot that is at issue. In that sense, even one fraudulent vote is damaging to the franchise and cheapens the process.

But to Lewis and others like Al Sharpton, the voter ID laws are “voter suppression” laws. “Our vote was soaked in the blood of martyrs,” Sharpton said, “and you cannot take it from us now.”

Mr. Sharpton, who as chief organizer gave himself the role of keynote speaker, seized the opportunity to raise the rhetorical temperature, noting that in past decades when blacks voted for Presidents Kennedy, Nixon, Bush and others, their IDs at the polls had been sufficient. “Why when we get to Obama do we need some special ID?” he said to a roar of approval.

“When we leave here we’re going to go to those states,” including North Carolina and Texas, he continued. “And when they ask us for our voter ID, take out a photo of Medgar Evers.” Take out other photos of slain civil rights activists of the ’60s “who gave their lives so we could vote,” he added. “ ‘Look at this photo. It gives you the ID of who we are.’ ”

In the 2012 election, the percentage of the black vote rose compared to 2008 when there were few voter ID laws. Where are all these disenfranchised voters? And Sharpton, who has compared voter ID laws to literacy tests and other voter suppression tactics during the Jim Crow era in the south, makes a mockery of the truth when he talks of a “special ID” needed in order to vote. There is nothing “special” about a driver’s license or state ID card. To claim otherwise is pure demagoguery — something Sharpton has a lot of expertise in.

Other speakers raised the specter of Trayvon Martin and New York city’s “stop and frisk” practice. But with all this fearmongering, what got lost in the demagoguery was the original message of Dr. King. It was a message steeped in the Christian tradition of the brotherhood of man — not so much “color blindness” but rather “color tolerance.” King had no illusions about the difficulties that lay ahead (nor his own vulnerabilities).  As he eerily proclaimed the night before he was murdered:

Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind.

Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!

And so I’m happy, tonight.

I’m not worried about anything.

I’m not fearing any man.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

That kind of courage and vision was missing from the speakers on the Mall today.

Rick Moran is PJ Media's Chicago editor and Blog editor at The American Thinker. He is also host of the"RINO Hour of Power" on Blog Talk Radio. His own blog is Right Wing Nut House.

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Top Rated Comments   
Have you noticed that the MSM and Google are trying to bury the stories about Lane and Belton? It's as if someone flipped a switch.

The narrative being promoted is that white people are killing blacks. This will give certain black 'extremists' the idea that it's a good thing to keep killing white people.

A cycle spins out of control: The more white people who are killed, the more incensed the white response...which will create a more violent response from the black community, which means that the white community will become more incensed, which means...

Someone, somewhere needs to stop this cycle before it spins out of control.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
“Why when we get to Obama do we need some special ID?” he said to a roar of approval."

FYI Al Baby, in the age of Obama voter fraud has been raised to an art form. Apparently,you've conveniently forgotten Barack's ACORN friends caught flagrantly registering single individuals multiple times during the '08 election, not to mention dead people and pet names making it onto the voter rolls.

Also, Al Baby, democrats are desperate to expand their voter base to include individuals like illegal aliens & convicted felons, the only conceivable way they can envision holding onto power indefinitely.

Because, creepy and ignorant Al ("Tawana Brawley") Baby, this nation is going down the tubes and you are leading the charge. Decline and engendering hate and mistrust are devices you share with the current president.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I’ve always stressed to my classes that there is a difference between fact and truth in regard to history – truth is what we choose to remember, fact is what actually happened. Remember the line from The Dark Knight about Two-Face? (Who, in his best characterizations, has always been written as a reflection of what Batman stood the chance of becoming):

‘You either die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.’

Very rarely does a person become a national hero without some fudging of the facts involved, and with Martin Luther King, this is doubly true. The uncontested facts are that he:

1. Habitually cheated on his wife.
2. Plagiarized his dissertation (among other works)
3. Openly flirted with communism to get his way, politically

That said, most of us (myself included) have been content to remember the man for his words on racial equality in the “I Have A Dream” speech and forget the aforementioned character flaws. Still, as Art Chance and BarocheDique discuss below, there are consequences to making this choice of selective memory. The American South, for example, has long become the whipping post of our national character, to such an extent that parodies and imitations of Southern culture in music and television (see country music and/or reality television) have become accepted as the real McCoy. Liberals use the logic that since Southerners are largely conservative and, by stereotype, racist, all conservatives are racist – and nobody questions it. Consequently, serious discussions of state’s rights, for example, are readily dismissed as racial code-words, even though top-heavy legislation such as the Civil Rights Act (and its later cousins) have been, and will continue to be, used for purposes far beyond their original intent.

Far be it for me to suggest this, but who are we to assume that Martin Luther King would not have approved such calloused remarks as those made by Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and his later namesake? When I look at heroes in the black community, I tend to admire those who earned their respect rather than demanded it. Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, Thomas Sowell - heroes who have never gotten the respect they deserve. Both Booker T. Washington and Martin Luther King died at a relatively young age, but at least I don’t have to be picky about what I choose to remember with Booker T.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (45)
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1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sorry, the "I have a dream" speech was just boob-bait-for-bubbas. MLK supported socialism, welfare, affirmative action, and communists in Vietnam. He fooled Moran but not me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Martin Luther King's dream was for us to look at one another, not by the color of our skin, but by the content of our character.

Unfortunately, some characters, like Jesse Jackson, have hijacked King's dream.

They banned the only Black U.S. Senator from the 50th Anniversary March.

It is an American travesty that the values of the most dominant modern Black leaders are virtually the antithesis of the heart of Martin Luther King.

Video: http://888webtoday.com/articles/viewnews.cgi?id=EFZZZZuAEFCoewCloO
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
J. Edgar Hoover vs. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Book Exposes FBI’s Targeting of the Civil Rights Leader

http://www.democracynow.org/2012/4/4/j_edgar_hoover_vs_martin_luther
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The thesis here is crap on crap. A double-stacked crap sandwich, open-faced. King was four-square in favor of Affirmative Action at least in its larval form. Is Jesse Jackson NOT his heir? Who is then? John McWhorter? JC Watts? No, there is no need and no foundation to separate King from his legacy. The "Civil Rights Movement" was never about racial equality but an inversion of the political status quo. White was up and black was down. Now white serves black, pouring the contents of our pockets, voluntarily or otherwise, into theirs. It wouldn't be so bad if they did anything with it but crush it up and smoke it. Oh well.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Race baiting is a "for profit" industry. Until the demagogues stop making money by fanning the non-existent flames, the country is in for rough times ..... maybe even all-out civil war - but do you think THEY actually care?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm not going to bother giving my racial bona fides as I'm getting good and g-damned tired of having to do so in today's racially charged environment. Suffice it to say that I used to consider myself a friend to blacks. But no longer. And while I'm just a nobody who occasionally comments on some blogs I know I have no power to change anything or to convince liberals and Democrats of the damage they're doing to the country with their race mongering. My final act of protest will be to say that I don't like blacks anymore. Period. Silly as it seems, that will be my final protest. And what gives me the tiniest - and only - bit of satisfaction is that the government and the Democrats and all the libtards can't do a g-damned thing about that. Pass all the laws they want but they can't make me like what I see as the most bullying, entitled, demanding and ungrateful bunch of people I've ever seen in my life.
I. Dont'. Like. You.
Sue me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
It's a shame you feel that way (but it's understandable, considering the few rotten apples that do spoil the entire basket); there are plenty of really decent black people out there. My profession has allowed me to be exposed to them. Beyond people like Thomas Sowell, Walter Williams, Clarence Thomas, etc., how about Antoinette Tuff? http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2013/0821/Georgia-school-shooting-averted-by-a-brave-bookkeeper-and-prayer-video

Believe you me though, nothing would please me more than to start reading stories of these whites who are being attacked by these black thugs pull a Zimmerman on them.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
“Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.”

The Politics of Faction - party strife and intrigue

This is the goal. Keep us divided then they can control us. This way lies serfdom.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm troubled by the constant use of the "racial equality" words being bandied around. The way I see it; MLK was talking about equality for all of us, UNDER THE LAW; which really is a worthy dream.
Unity means that the U.S.A. will move forward as an example to the entire world; and that's something that anti-American leftists (black and white), despise. Obama has an opportunity to honor MLK; I pray that he foregoes politics and brings honor to America in doing so.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Anyone who stokes racial animosity from the Left is probably doing it for personal gain, one way or another: economists call this "rent-seeking behavior", which is the enticing prospect of living on Other People's Money (OPM). The race-and-poverty profiteers are similar to the military-industrial complex. Just as the military-industrial complex doesn't necessarily contribute to world peace, so the race-and-poverty profiteers don't necessarily contribute to social justice. The profiteers form a tribe or posse, with members also occupying comfy perches in the non-profit sector, the media, academic, and the government Poverty Pentagon. The junior members of the profitee'rs tribe are the clueless followers who enjoy getting their resentments stoked. On the other side of the racial animosity divide are people who feel manipulated, insulted, and lied to by the race-and-poverty profiteers, and who are fed up with the shakedowns. People's complexions are not the issue. The issue is the ill effects of successful rent-seeking and the bogus ideology that supports it. The policies the poverty profiteers have endorsed for the past 50 years have just made things much worse for the clueless followers -- it's pathetic. Poor Dr. King! I heard him speak when I was a teenager. He had his flaws, just like the rest of us, but he was a great man. His unworthy successors should be ashamed.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Race relations today are worse than they have been since Rodney King or Tawana Browley. Our exceptional country is being turned into Poland of 1965
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Absolutely.... In 1965 I was 100% behind "civil rights" for minorities. I hoped that within a decade or two, this country could put this behind us. I even lost a job due to racial quotas - I didn't get mad, I just moved on and got another. Fast forward to 2013, the situation regarding race is probably as bad as I can remember in my 65 years. The War on Poverty, Affirmative Action and other Civil Rights legislation have not improved the African American community one iota. They have had the opposite effect. They have turned it into a whining, dependent, cultural wasteland. MLK would NOT be proud at all.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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