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The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

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July 25, 2013 - 7:43 am

A Florida Republican called the announcement by some celebrities that they would boycott the state over its “Stand Your Ground” law “silly at best.”

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.) said he was “disappointed and amazed.”

“You have a number of entertainers who, for example, have gone to the state’s sponsor of terrorism island which is Cuba. They’ve been there. They’ve hobnobbed with dictatorship. They don’t meet with the opposition. They don’t meet with the families of the political prisoners,” he said on Fox Business.

“But then some of them will say that you should boycott Florida, a land of freedom, a land where they can choose what they want to do and open businesses or opt to not open businesses. You know, the double standard is frankly pretty silly at best.”

Diaz-Balart said the brutality of Cuba shouldn’t just pique the celebs’ interest, but the racism.

“The things that Che Guevara said about blacks, he was an incredible racist. The things he said about Mexicans, the things that he said about, you know, how it doesn’t require evidence to execute people. The things that he said about wanting to nuke New York City and murder Americans — and yet, you have some of these shirts with his face on them,” the congressman said.

“…There is a rapper who has been in prison in Cuba because all he wants to do is sing his rap music. Jay-Z didn’t even want to meet with him? It’s really sad and that double standard is frankly destructive, dangerous and shows a little bit of ignorance, obviously.”

Diaz-Balart said he doesn’t think the boycott call will hit Florida hard.

“I mean, look, the state of Florida is doing better than most of the states in the country. Unemployment numbers are dropping much quicker than the rest of the country. Investment is increasing. Job creating is increasing. We appreciate good entertainment, but I think that we have to remember who these folks are,” he said. “They are entertainers. People appreciate them for their entertainment value. Not necessarily for their intellectual value. However, when they do things like hobnob with anti-American terrorist regimes then I think that that is when you draw the line.”

Bridget Johnson is a career journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

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All Comments   (7)
All Comments   (7)
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I wouldn't worry too much about losing what is laughingly being referred to as music. As far as Jay-Z goes, I agree with Axel Rose. I think "Rap" rhymes with "Crap". And his wife does nothing but wail and dance around semi-clad. Hardly what I would consider talent. To quote Homer Simpson, "Celebrities, is there anything they don't know?!"
52 weeks ago
52 weeks ago Link To Comment
Low info music celebs not entertaining their mostly stoned low info audience...please tell me why I should be upset. The only people disappointed will be the dope dealers and their customer base.
52 weeks ago
52 weeks ago Link To Comment
These low-information celebrities are selling the fable that Zimmerman walked because of Florida's Stand Your Ground law. Stand Your Ground was never involved in the case and had nothing to do with the outcome. These celebrities might as well be protesting the local jaywalking ordinance for all the bearing it had on the case.

If they all hold their breath until the law is repealed, that's fine by me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"low-information celebrities". But I repeat myself.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The entertainer's boycott of Florida will end on October 29. The NBA Miami Heat will open the season at home in Miami. All the loud-mouthed entertainers will clam up and show up in Miami. Bet on it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I know that this is off-topic but the Cuban Boycott thing has got to end already. Che is long dead and buried. The intellectual lightweights who cheer him posthumously are irrelevant. Fidel is dying. Raoul is a feckless wannabee. And the country could be steered into a more US-friendly orbit given some engagement. They would certainly become more of a buffer against Sandanista-led Nicaragua. They may even help lead post-Chávez Venezuela to become less confrontational.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Che wasn't the only one who wanted the Soviets to nuke America during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Fidel Castro BEGGED the Soviets to nuke America at the time. I saw the documents (in translation) myself at the George Washington University website a few years back. He is still the Secretary-General of the Cuban Communist Party and while he's not as frequently seen as he used to be, he's not dead or even retired, just keeping a lower profile.

When Fidel led the forces that evicted Batista in January 1959, he swore that he had no ambitions to run the country and promised free and fair democratic elections with a few months. I was three years old at the time and I'm 58 now but we STILL haven't seen those free and fair democratic elections yet. As soon as he holds those elections, I would be prepared to see an end to the boycott. Until then though, I think it should stay in place.

As for leveraging a still-communist Cuba against Sandinista-led Nicaragua or post-Chavez Venezuela, I think you're dreaming in technicolor. I see no reason whatever to believe that any of those things could happen until Cuba has a freely-elected democratic government.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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