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The PJ Tatler

by
Stephen Green

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July 1, 2013 - 8:13 am

Wow:

The head of Egypt’s armed forces gave politicians 48 hours on Monday to answer demands made by the Egyptian people or the military would offer its own “road map for the future.”

In a statement read on state television, General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi called mass protests on Sunday, which called for Islamist President Mohamed Mursi to resign, an “unprecedented” expression of the popular will.

Will the Muslim Brotherhood go quietly, or is Egypt destined to be the next Syria?

UPDATE: Our own Barry Rubin was actually first with this story, beating out AP, Reuters, and WFB.

Stephen Green began blogging at VodkaPundit.com in early 2002, and has served as PJMedia's Denver editor since 2008. He's one of the hosts on PJTV, and one-third of PJTV's Trifecta team with Scott Ott and Bill Whittle. Steve lives with his wife and sons in the hills and woods of Monument, Colorado, where he enjoys the occasional lovely adult beverage.

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All Comments   (5)
All Comments   (5)
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There are currently no good options for Egypt. The country desperately needs political stability to deal with severe economic problems, even if it comes at the cost of a military dictatorship. The best hope for Egypt is a more or less benign secular dictatorship with pragmatic economic principles, and political policies.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
or is Egypt destined to be the next Syria?
No. I think it's destined to be the next Algeria, where the military took over some years ago after an Islamist electoral victory. Like that debacle, this will be the "best" option of nothing but very bad choices for Egypt.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
What happens if Morsi does step down? I don't know what the current Egyptian constitution requires. Does he simply get replaced by someone else in his own party, chosen only by party members? Does he get replaced by his vice-president? Or doesn't he have one (Mubarak deliberately left his own VP slot open for decades)? Or do the rules call for a new election? Unless there are new elections - or a military coup - I see no significant benefit from driving Morsi out.

Don't get me wrong, I'd really like to see new elections. Then again, I don't know if they will change anything. During the last elections, the Muslim Brotherhood was apparently the only properly organized group and won against very disorganized opponents. If they hold new elections and the anti-MB forces are just as disorganized, all that will happen is a different MB leader will come into power. He may be even worse than Morsi for all we know.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
Egypt could do a lot worse than its own Ataturk.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
At this point, I'm hoping for a military coup. It's that bad.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
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