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The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

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June 28, 2013 - 7:49 am

A Lone Star State congressman who filed suit against Gov. Rick Perry to try to block a voter ID law said he did so because the law “sends the wrong message about Texas.”

Rep. Marc Veasey (D-Texas) sued after Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott said he would immediately implement the voter ID law that had been blocked by the federal courts but was liberated by the Supreme Court ruling that deemed Section 4 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act unconstitutional.

“This law was found to be discriminatory. And the fact just because section four was struck down that you would move to make a law that a court has found to be discriminatory is absolutely nonsense,” Veasey said on MSNBC.

“We are a great state and don’t want to send a message to businesses and companies and people that are moving to the state of Texas in record numbers, mostly Latino and African-American, that discrimination is OK. We need to stop. I believe this law, this voter I.D. law passed by Republicans, when I was still in the legislature in 2011, that it’s discriminatory and violates section two.”

Veasey said during his four terms in the state legislature he “saw some of the worst discrimination as far as public policy is concerned coming from Republicans trying to implement that public policy so it would have an adverse impact on African-American and Latinos when it comes to exercising the right to vote.”

“Groups like the King Street Patriots, they are alive and well, and they are actively trying to make sure that Republicans can continue to win elections at the expense of African-American and Latino voters,” he said, singling out the Tea Party group that created True the Vote. “And absolutely Texas is not in any position to say that we should, can live in a post-section five world. There is no absolutely no doubt about that.”

Like many Democrats after the ruling, Veasey advocated a bipartisan reworking of the Voting Rights Act in Congress.

“Let’s come together and let’s be for fairness,” he said. “We want people to know that Texas and other states want to do the right thing when it comes to all of its citizens, and we know that many of these policies, like the ones trying to be implemented in Texas, are simply unfair.”

Bridget Johnson is a career journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

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All Comments   (7)
All Comments   (7)
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Memo to Marc Veasey:

Here's the "message" Texas is sending, Jackass! In Texas, you have to be legally qualifited to vote before you can cast a ballot . . .period! If you're legally qualified to vote, no problem! if you're not, no vote. This is a message that is good for America, and good for all those who care about keeping our constitutional republic - native born and naturalized citizens alike!
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Texas will distribute free photo i.d.'s to anyone who can prove residency with a current electric bill. It only discriminates against those who aren't residents but try to vote anyhow, or try to vote more than once.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Talk about a frivolous law suit! In the past, Texas has suffered from a reputation for election fraud, perpetrated mainly by Democrats. Implementing a voter ID requirement would IMPROVE Texas's image and reputation for integrity.

41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Voter ID law “sends the wrong message about Texas (and any State that takes needed steps to assure demonstrable election integrity? ).”

In an age when many Nations, and the United States, in particular, dismiss/ignore “rules of law” where they generally impede politically desired ends; implement “rules of law” selectively to achieve desired political results and decry a rule of law, which in this case, would assure demonstrable election integrity ... I commend Attorney General Abbott’s actions to implement and enforce Texas Voter ID law!

As a citizen of a deep blue State (Maryland) and being from a deep blue State (Illinois/Chicago), where the State has taken steps every legislative session to weaken and compromise the integrity of election results, I would welcome theTexas message to every citizen, business or company moving to the state of Texas that - the State of Texas takes its laws and its elections seriously and is taking steps to assure legitimacy through (a voter ID) compliance.

Eligible citizen/voters of all stripes should welcome this initiative. To say “lawfulness would have an adverse impact on African-American and Latinos when it comes to exercising the right to vote” is disingenuous at best. Better that concerned parties take any and all legitimate steps they consider necessary to achieve just results - in keeping with the law, than attempt to declare a legal election through Voter IDs, unjust.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Does he have standing to sue? I doubt it. It's a publicity stunt.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
Democrats who concede that vote fraud exists are few, but most of them insist that it happens before the showing of ID at the polls, in the registration process.

Then they turn around and fight Voter ID laws like Patton fought Rommel.

Maybe I'm being paranoid, but I sense dishonesty in there. Can't quite put my finger on it...
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
Unfair how exactly? Please, please explain in actual real word experience. So tired of this "it's unfair" nonsense! My wife had to show a photo ID to visit the eye doctor yesterday. Should we file suit here in NC because it's unfair/racist? Come on! Grow up!
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
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