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by
Rick Moran

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May 25, 2013 - 11:14 am

Amidst the Republican cheer about scandals afflicting the Obama administration and Democrats, there is a far more interesting sideshow going on in Washington — one that threatens to tear the GOP apart right at the time they need to be unified in order to keep the House and take control of the Senate next year.

It’s the ongoing, destructive feud between two Senators representing different factions of the Republican Senate. John McCain representing the GOP establishment and Ted Cruz, darling of the Tea Party nationwide, have been going at it all week on the Senate floor. The proximate cause of the sniping and backbiting has been the GOP establishment’s desire to move the budget recently passed by Senate Democrats to a conference committee. But Cruz, Marco Rubio, Mike Lee, and Rand Paul are blocking the motion because they believe the Democrats will try to slip a rise in the debt ceiling somewhere in the budget, thus denying conservatives the opportunity to use the debt as leverage in their efforts to get the congress on record to pass a balanced budget in 10 years.

The real fight is for the very soul of the Republican party and what the public face of the GOP will be. Will Republicans be seen as ideologically rigid obstructionists, hell bent on preventing the functioning of government, eschewing compromise even with members of their own party? This is what establishmentarians like John McCain, Susan Collins, and other more moderate Republicans fear. They are afraid that the Tea Party is playing directly into the narrative established by President Obama and the Democrats about the GOP being a far right, unreasonable collection of people who hate government.

Whether it’s true or not isn’t the point. With an eager media advancing that perception by gleefully reporting Senator Cruz’s every bombastic utterance, the efforts by McCain and other establishment figures in the party to temper the GOP image seems doomed to fail.

Washington Post:

In an effort to assuage concerns — or perhaps highlight his belief that they are unfounded — McCain pointed to the fact that the House GOP majority will also be a part of the conference process, protecting against the outcome feared by the conservative senators.

But none of it would sway Cruz, who has quickly established himself as the fiery voice of the right in the Senate.

“I will suggest to my friend from Arizona, there may be more wacko birds in the Senate than is suspected,” the Texas senator said Thursday, before wagering McCain could not secure the willingness of most Senate Republicans to allow the risk of Democrats raising the debt ceiling.

So confident was Cruz that he offered to wear an Arizona Diamondbacks hat at a Houston Astros home baseball game if he was proven incorrect.

The House GOP has been riven by discord since the 2010 wave election ushered in a new class of lawmakers with little regard for the “way things work” or loyalty to party leadership. In the more orderly Senate, we are starting to see something similar take place. It’s grown clear that the disputes between McCain and Cruz are not limited to a single issue. Budget fight? Check. Foreign policy spat? Done.

Cruz’s “wacko birds” remark was a reference to a pejorative label McCain gave him, Paul and Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) earlier this year. McCain and his close ally, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), objected strongly to Paul’s marathon filibuster over the Obama administration’s use of unmanned aerial drones. Joining Paul were Cruz, other conservatives, and notably, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has been mindful of his image on the right among as he seeks to avoid a primary threat in 2014.

McCain, Graham, and the rest of the party establishment in the Senate appear to be at a loss on how to handle Cruz and his allies. Given their popularity in some quarters of the party, the usual Senate disciplinary measures probably won’t work. Sticking Cruz on obscure committees and ignoring any legislation he proposes appear not to phase the Texas Senator one bit. He revels in his “outsider” reputation — going so far as to say that he doesn’t trust Republicans when it comes to dealing with the debt. Those kind of statements are guaranteed to make him enemies.

But even more fundamental to the dispute is a vision of how government should work. If you approach governance by believing that compromise is betrayal, the opposition should be crushed, and that going to war against members of your own party is a viable means to advance an agenda, nothing will get done and your nihilistic philosophy of government will triumph. Further, if you believe this philosophy to be a pathway to higher office — the highest — such a damaging, uncaring approach to the people’s business will probably not be rewarded by the voters.

Cruz is popular with the right because he articulates the rage of many who think that the GOP establishment is weak willed and refuses to engage the Democrats in the kind of hand to hand combat that Cruz excels at. To one degree or another, they are probably right. But Republicans are going to need all hands on deck if they are to reach their goals in 2014. With the establishment wanting to make Cruz and his allies walk the plank while the Tea Party looks to feed establishmentarians to the sharks, the two sides appear to be irreconcilable — a fact that will sink Republican hopes in the mid terms.

Rick Moran is PJ Media's Chicago editor and Blog editor at The American Thinker. He is also host of the"RINO Hour of Power" on Blog Talk Radio. His own blog is Right Wing Nut House.

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Top Rated Comments   
The GOP Establishment and the Democrat Establishhment are the right and left wings of the Ruling Class in Washington. The GOP Establishment hates the Tea Party. The Democrat Establishment hates the Tea Party. Both wings of the Ruling Class agree that a large central government with an entrenched cadre of professional bureaucrats is essential to maintain a civil society. They only differ on who should be in charge (majority) and who should be in the "loyal opposition" (minority). The TEA Party (Taxed Enough Already) believes in a smaller central government as limited by the Constitution, with the remaining rights the responsibility of the states and the people. They believe in fiscal responsibility, constitutional integrity, and a strong national defense. They represent the Country Class.

Rick Moran is a sock puppet for the GOP Establishment. That is why he can call the TEA Party " ideologically rigid obstructionists, hell bent on preventing the functioning of government, eschewing compromise even with members of their own party." That is why he says the TEA Party "approaches governance by believing that compromise is betrayal, the opposition should be crushed, and that going to war against members of your own party is a viable means to advance an agenda, nothing will get done and your nihilistic philosophy of government will triumph."

There is only one thing in Moran's ode to RINOs that is correct: the real fight is for the very soul of the Republican party and what the public face of the GOP will be.

Here's a graphic example of the difference between the Ruling Class and the Country Class. The House is holding hearings on the coverup by the Obama administration at Benghazi. Documents have surfaced that indicate Victoria Nuland of the State Department was involved in editing the CIA statements on the cause of the attack to blame an obscure video instead of a planned Al Queda operation. Yesterday, the Obama administration announced that Victoria Nuland was going to be promoted to Asst. Secretary of State - in the middle of the Congressional investigation. Both John McCain and Lindsey Graham enthusiastically supported the nomination. You see, Nuland is a career bureaucrat and an established member of the Ruling Class.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
That's amazing. Are you secretly a Democrat, Mr. Moran? John McCain and his ilk are the reason the Republican Party is the cowardly, greedy, feckless mess that it is today and a large part of the reason we have that sociopath in our White House for the second time. They've compromised themselves and in the process, the American people, almost out of existence. No more compromise, which in RINO Speak means "caving" and in Democrat Speak means "We do whatever we want and you suck it up." The future of the Republican Party, its very survival, depend on these fiery young guns like Cruz and Paul. I'm with them, especially if they have the courage to leave the foolish old elitists and form their own party. I'll vote Tea Party over Republican any day.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Remember when Rand Paul filibustered because the Obama administration would not rule out use of drones in the US? Remember when Cruz and Paul threatened to filibuster gun control legislation? Now in light of the Obama scandals, they look like the sane ones. Their critics look like fools.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (32)
All Comments   (32)
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There is nothing new about the old bulls trying to crush the young upstarts. What else should we expect? In the "normal" course of things, the upstarts lose, for lack of support and experience, running the risk of having wasted their courage, and perhaps even sunk their career. For instance, Marco Rubio bravely invested himself in the promotion of am immigration bill that is unlikely to meet his criteria in the end, and might well fail altogether. Even with the deft behind-the-scene maneuvering of the old hands, the bill may well be too much to swallow in the house (and even in the senate), after the electorate has finally learned to be skeptical with the lessons, some yet to be learned, of Obamacare. But we are not in the "normal" course of things, we are in an awakening of the electorate. Nothing extraordinary will ever happen without a few brave souls willing to risk their careers. After all, the predicament we are in comes from many members of congress who have been exceedingly talented in the art of preserving one's career.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
John McCain had his chance and left his mark...unsustainable welfare programs, a corrupt dependency culture, etc. It is time for him and his ilk to step aside and let another generation clean up the mess he has made.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Rick Moran, at it again. So the "Tea Party" should just roll over and let McCain cross the aisle again. And next year there will another reason not to fight the RINOS. And the year and on and on. Just when does the conservative (constitutional) wing of the Republican party have a chance to put in place their ideas? They were elected by those who like what they proposed to do. So Moran thinks they should jettison all that just to get along. What hogwash. been hearing the codswallop for DECADES now. Maybe Juan McCain should STFU and start doing what he PROMISED he would when he faced his own ouster before Sarah Palin stepped in and saved his fat decrepit arse? Let the RINOS start compromising with the Tea Party. Not the other way around.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Rick Moran, you don't get it, or you are part of it. How do you compromise with radical ideologues whose goals are 180 degrees away from yours, and who pay no attention to the most basic of our founding principles? You can't; that's the point.

An intellectual duel between Cruz & McCain? No contest.

What the GOP doesn't get is that a huge number of "wackobirds" in their party would go elsewhere if that were a viable option; establishment Republicans outside the ruling class are a much smaller group than the GOP thinks.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Another way to say it is with a question: "What is the compromise position between right and wrong? Between good and evil? Between truth and fiction?"
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
"Republicans are going to need all hands on deck if they are to reach their goals in 2014."

McCain has never been there when needed. He couldn't even be bothered to show up fo his own presidential campaign.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Exactly when should Senator Cruz buck the GOP Establishment? It will always be the wrong time. The only way to make a change is to start from where we are at. The GOP Establishment have been the ones that have compromised our way into this mess. Sounds like Senator Cruz is fighting the whole problem, not just the other side.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
McCain has been tainted since Lincoln Savings and Loan. Cruz shouldn't hold back. There needs to be a reckoning.

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I went to a Second Amendment rallly today. It was opened by the reading of a letter of support from Gov. Rick Perry and the closing speaker also read a letter. This one delivered Fedx this morning from Sen Ted Cruz.
It was a great letter also. Inspiring even. Mr Curz is listening to Texans. Can the people of Arizona say the same about old John?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
McCain, Graham, and the rest of the party establishment are at a loss on how to deal with Cruz and his allies?
They should surrender.
It's what they're good at.
They've had lots of practice.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Funny, Rick. You never talk about McCain, Graham, and Collins (and the rest of the moderate Establishment) reaching out for a compromise with Cruz, Lee, and the others among the "new generation." Are the "Tea Party senators" the only ones that have to give ground, while McCain hurls insults at them?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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