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The PJ Tatler

by
Dan Miller

Bio

October 20, 2011 - 9:44 am

It is reported here that

The United States deported the largest amount of people in the last year in the nation’s history, immigration officials say.

John Morton, the director of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, says the agency deported nearly 400,000 individuals during the fiscal year 2011 that just ended in September.

ICE said about 55 percent of those deported had felony or misdemeanor convictions.

. . . .

Officials said the number of deported individuals who had been convicted of crimes was up 89 percent from 2008. But officials could not immediately say how many of those crimes were related to immigration violations.

Among those deported were more than 1,000 people convicted of homicide. Another 5,800 were sexual offenders, and about 80,000 people convicted of drug related crimes or driving under the influence.

Authorities say two-thirds of those deported either recently crossed the border or had done so repeatedly.

Isn’t that great! Won’t see them again any time soon!  But wait.  .  .  .  Guess what?

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It is reported here that

MEXICO CITY – President Felipe Calderon on Monday accused U.S. authorities of deporting Mexican criminals to save on judicial costs, a policy that ostensibly “exacerbates” violence in this country [Mexico]. Within the framework of the inauguration of National Immigration Week 2011 in this capital, Calderon said that, for example, U.S. authorities “are deporting up to 80,000 people in a year” into the border cities of Reynosa and Ciudad Juarez.

Some of these deported people “are migrants, certainly, probably all of them,” although some were “already involved in criminal acts” in the United States. “In the face of the dilemma of pursuing the legal process in the American courts, which implies costs for the administration of justice in that country, they simply prefer to deport them to border cities, by which the cycle of violence is exacerbated even more,” he said.

National Immigration Week? Thanks.  We surely need more. If we somehow found a way to keep them from entering the U.S. in the first place, wouldn’t that also exacerbate violence in Mexico?

Oh. I almost forgot. President Calderon’s concern, of course, is mainly for the little children.

The Mexican leader went on to say that it is “truly inhumane and scandalous” that U.S. authorities are apprehending and deporting alone and “without any protection” children as young as 6.

Those minors who cross Mexico from Central America run the risk along the way of becoming victims of “criminal bands,” are exposed to the dangers of crossing the border and, in addition, confront the security forces of the United States,” Calderon said.

“I hope authorities in other countries become aware of how aberrant it is to leave a child to his fate in our country, without guaranteeing that he can once again find his parents or relatives,” he said.

Big hearted as he is, President Calderon did not offer any financial support to help the border states care the little dears. He just does not want them back in Mexico.  Why not? Surely, the Mexican authorities will be delighted to take care of them.

Dan Miller graduated from Yale University in 1963 and from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1966. He retired from the practice of law in Washington, D.C., in 1996 and has lived in a rural area in Panama since 2002.
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