10. Indiana War Memorial Plaza Historic District

Throughout four consecutive blocks, Indianapolis recognizes our military heroes. Standing tall in the center of “Circle City,” the Indiana World War Memorial was constructed to honor soldiers from the Great War. General of the Armies John “Black Jack” Pershing laid the ceremonial cornerstone July 4, 1927, two years after the American Legion moved their national headquarters to Indianapolis, where they remain two blocks north. The War Memorial opened its doors on Armistice Day, 1933. A cenotaph, honoring the first soldier killed in World War I, from Indiana no less, sits at the plaza’s northern end.

Because there is so much history within walking distance around downtown, people from around the world visit the area. I know this from experience as a state historian. If you go a few blocks north, you’ll hit the Benjamin Harrison Home, where the 23rd president lived, campaigned and died. A few blocks to the south is the incredible Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument, which we’ll discuss later.