Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

Israel on Holocaust Remembrance Day

Has the world made progress since then?

by
P. David Hornik

Bio

April 28, 2014 - 5:00 am
Page 1 of 3  Next ->   View as Single Page

PJ-Yom HaShoah-1

Yom HaShoah or Holocaust Remembrance Day fell this year on yesterday evening and today. Yom HaShoah (literally “Day the-Holocaust” in Hebrew) was declared a national memorial day in Israel in 1953, five years after the state’s establishment, and is now observed throughout the Jewish world.

Unlike much older Jewish holidays, Yom HaShoah has had to be improvised. By now, in Israel (where I’ve been living for almost 30 years), the day has a structure and contents that rather effectively convey somberness and an intense identification with the Holocaust’s victims.

Yom HaShoah begins in Israel (at sundown) with a ceremony in a square beside Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem. I’ve been watching it on TV now for years and generally find it tactful, authentic, and moving. It includes speeches by the prime minister and the president before an honor guard, the lighting of six torches (symbolizing six million victims) by Holocaust survivors, musical presentations, and most of all the heart-wrenching singing of the prayer “El Malei Rahamim” by the chief army cantor.

Yom HaShoah is a regular workday, but with places of entertainment closed and all TV and radio programs devoted to Holocaust-related themes. At 11 a.m. sirens blare throughout the country and all traffic and motion stops. Drivers exit their cars and, like the surrounding pedestrians, stand for the two-minute duration of the siren in silent commemoration. These are moments of eerie, slightly frightening power.

YouTube Preview Image

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (6)
All Comments   (6)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
Forever not again.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
Le'olam al tishkach
Forever do not forget

Le'olom lo od
Forever





44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
If the question "has the world learned anything since then" means genocide throughout the world since 1945, then the answer is, the world has learned nothing.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, the trend is towards and away from integration. To the extent that such integration occurs and the Jewish soul remains intact, it is acceptable. However, it is often at the price of security (see - Oslo Accords) and self-respect. So the issue is not whether Israel can integrate partially 'among the nations.' It is whether it is good for us. In demonstrable ways, the urges to integration and acceptance appear to derive from a lack of confidence, and lead to terrible phenomena (Oslo victims, identity victims). There needs to be more spiritual isolation, in a positive sense, not a rupture on practical grounds. There needs to be more caution in swimming into streams still full of hatred towards us and ours.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
That video is just short of unreal.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm imagining being a tourist in Israel as this takes place. If it were me, and I wasn't aware of this practice ahead of time (and this is the first I've heard of it), I would be VERY surprised to find the sirens wailing and then all traffic coming to a stop and everyone getting out of their cars and just standing there. I'm not sure what I'd think: perhaps that nukes were on the way and everyone knew there was no time to get to shelter....
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All