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A Baseball Mom’s Take on Richard Sherman’s NFL Postgame Rant

There's no crying in baseball — or football. Man up, Richard, and show a little self-control next time.

by
Paula Bolyard

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January 23, 2014 - 8:00 am
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“We’re talking about football here, and a lot of people took it further than football,” Sherman said. “I was on a football field showing passion. Maybe it was misdirected and immature, but this is a football field. I wasn’t committing any crimes and doing anything illegal. I was showing passion after a football game.” — Richard Sherman, Seattle Seahawks cornerback

Our family’s first foray into youth sports didn’t go quite as planned. The female coach who had volunteered to coach our son’s T-ball team told the children on the first day that the players who didn’t get dirty would get candy at the end of the game. A few parents took this well-meaning (but misguided) mother aside and explained to her a few things about the nature of boys and something about the physical properties of  baseball and dirt and informed her that their sons would not be participating in her little “clean game” nonsense. This was our introduction to the ubiquitous drama that permeates youth sports leagues.

My husband and I spent a lot of years coaching youth sports as our sons grew up — baseball, soccer, basketball — mostly because we were the only parents who didn’t drop-and-run. We weren’t savvy enough in the early years to realize that you are by default the U4 soccer coach if you’re the only parent left on the field five minutes after practice is scheduled to begin (other parents, making a beeline to the parking lot, shouted to us, “The whistle and cones are in the blue crate! We’ll see you in an hour. Good luck!”)

We always believed it was important for our boys to participate in team sports, not only for physical fitness reasons, but because they were of the male gender and we thought that participating in sports would be a good way for them to learn to control and channel the aggression that is inherent to their maleness.

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Top Rated Comments   
I appreciate your comment, but, as I have tried to do elsewhere in this thread, I would like people to recognize a media narrative when they are being fed one. Your first impression of Richard was his post-game rant because the media wanted that to be your one and only impression of Richard.

The media had both Crabtree and Richard mic'd up during the game and had audio and video showing what led up to the rant (that Richard held out his hand to Crabtree saying, "Good game, good game," that Crabtree pushed the hand away, and that Crabtree then slapped Richard). The video has been posted on this thread by jaydee007 and is also now appearing on the news, now that the narrative about Richard has been set, but it took FIVE DAYS for this video to surface.

One cannot possibly think that the media was unaware that they had Richard and Crabtree mic'd up and that it took the media FIVE DAYS to get around to checking out the video. Instead the media has its narrative, to be played and replayed incessantly until the Superbowl. What is reality is that, after Richard beat out Crabtree to win the game, Richard held out his hand to Crabtree (a hand that was accepted by numerous 49ers players), Crabtree reacted boorishly, and Richard overreacted to that. Since Crabtree won't be in the Superbowl and Richard will, the narrative is written that Richard is the total villain.

Richard has apologized to his team and to the fans of Seattle, something grown men do after they behave badly. Crabtree has not apologized and most likely won't because he won't be held accountable since he, as a non-participant in the Superbowl, is outside of the media narrative.

The bigger picture for everyone here is that a media narrative was written to create a Superbowl storyline and that there was contradictory video that was withheld until the media narrative could be set.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
What nonsense. Sherman made a bee-line for Crabtree to shake his hand for one reason: to humiliate him, and Crabtree knew it. Secondly, the reason Sherman apologized was because of the larger culture around him, not because he realized on his own he'd done wrong.

And that sad TV clip doesn't show what got Sherman his unsportsmanlike taunting penalty - making a choking gesture to the SF quarterback. Why did this revealing video leave that out? And why did Sherman throw Kaepernick the choke sign? Well, Kaepernick had the audacity to throw the ball in Sherman's direction; a sure sign of disrespecting Sherman. If that's not thug attitude there is no such thing. Sherman's a joke right out of a stereotype factory and his attitude is as common as dirt right around this country.

Let's do this the other way. Let's say Sherman's culture rules in this situation. Is there an apology? No. If I'm wrong, then go to Compton and and show me all the apologies after heated discussions, fights and shootings over nothing - respect. The fact is, there shouldn't be a culture of humiliation in the first place. One needs only look at where such a culture exists and where it doesn't to put Sherman in his proper perspective.

If I had 100 dollars for every time I've heard "He disrespected me" I'd be living on my own island. Enough with the chest-thumping, lion roars, stupid dances and intimidating stares. I find it boring in sports and it is positively dangerous in real life, as if an NFL player in jail for murder doesn't point that up. Sherman humiliated Crabtree and apologized cuz someone tapped him on the shoulder. NFL players get caught with guns all the time. Why? What sane millionaire runs around with illegal weapons?
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (40)
All Comments   (40)
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The article is well done, but hey, maybe expecting stuffed shirt decorum 1 minute after one of the most important and emotional events of man's life, particularly when the event is a professional championship game in a sport where over-the-to aggression is a requirement, is a bit too much too demand.

Sherman is getting a bum rap.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Trash talk?

Anybody remember Larry Bird?
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Don't you open your mouth about the best, or I'm gonna shut it for you real quick."

Multiply that by urban centers across America and tell me where role models give and get ideas and what happens when 18 kabillion young men all vie to be proven the best and demand respect.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Oh please.
You want sportsmanship, you give sportsmanship.
You want to trash talk, expect to get trash talk.
Crabtree mouthed off, Sherman threw it back at him.
Searching for a reason to put Sherman down is as bad as searching for a reason to excuse it beyond simple give what you get.

Ignore a bad call from a ref?
And never fight a parking ticket, right?
Or refuse a request for a search from a cop with no warrant?
Unfair is unfair no matter how big or how small.

Ignore the bad behavior of others on the field?
And don't speak up about someone spreading stories about you?
Don't say anything about disruptive behavior in a public place?
Bullies are bullies whether they are doing it in sports or doing it in a restaurant.

And no, it isn't always someone else's responsibility to do something about it.
You don't always have a coach to object to a bad call for you.
The other coach doesn't always discipline his obnoxious player.
Sometimes you have to be the one to speak up for yourself.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
What an amazing coincidence that everyone is a bully to Sherman in every game. I have sad tears for what I am sure would otherwise be a reserved and polite young man who is oppressed by the rest of the bullying NFL.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
So Sherman speaks like this after every game?
After every play?
Then why hasn't this been made an issue before?
Or are you just throwing another strawman out there and hoping it sticks?

I have sad tears for those who cannot celebrate for the accomplishments of others because it means everyone knows they aren't the best at something.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
I guess I would say that when you compete, you have to get into the right mindset to do it. Sometimes, that mindset isn't a pretty thing. I was a hurdler I know. We're all "different" to put it nicely. You have to be to run over large obstacles at top speed.

So you put this guy, who is a d-back, part of a team's last line of defense, onto a guy he's known to have a not-so-friendly rivalry with in a huge game, and he makes the game-saving play ... and you catch him before he gets out of his gameface mindset? You're asking for trouble.

Yeah, he shouldn't have gone off, but you're asking for trouble to jam a mic in his face, too.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
I’m not a football fan, so I never heard of Richard Sherman until I saw his post-game rant on the local news. His mom should have told him first impressions are lasting.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
I appreciate your comment, but, as I have tried to do elsewhere in this thread, I would like people to recognize a media narrative when they are being fed one. Your first impression of Richard was his post-game rant because the media wanted that to be your one and only impression of Richard.

The media had both Crabtree and Richard mic'd up during the game and had audio and video showing what led up to the rant (that Richard held out his hand to Crabtree saying, "Good game, good game," that Crabtree pushed the hand away, and that Crabtree then slapped Richard). The video has been posted on this thread by jaydee007 and is also now appearing on the news, now that the narrative about Richard has been set, but it took FIVE DAYS for this video to surface.

One cannot possibly think that the media was unaware that they had Richard and Crabtree mic'd up and that it took the media FIVE DAYS to get around to checking out the video. Instead the media has its narrative, to be played and replayed incessantly until the Superbowl. What is reality is that, after Richard beat out Crabtree to win the game, Richard held out his hand to Crabtree (a hand that was accepted by numerous 49ers players), Crabtree reacted boorishly, and Richard overreacted to that. Since Crabtree won't be in the Superbowl and Richard will, the narrative is written that Richard is the total villain.

Richard has apologized to his team and to the fans of Seattle, something grown men do after they behave badly. Crabtree has not apologized and most likely won't because he won't be held accountable since he, as a non-participant in the Superbowl, is outside of the media narrative.

The bigger picture for everyone here is that a media narrative was written to create a Superbowl storyline and that there was contradictory video that was withheld until the media narrative could be set.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Grown men apologize on their own, not because they are reminded by others it is proper to do so. In the neighborhood Sherman learned this behavior, there is no such balancing force, and so no apologies.

As for a narrative being pushed, when will we see the video and hear you talk about the choke sign Sherman directed to the SF quarterback? If the media is pushing a narrative, why are they not showing that too, and why are you joining them in not addressing it? Heal yourself before accusing others.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
When the NFL allowed the dogslayer Michael Vick to resume his career I banned the NFL from my house. This year my wife got caught up in 49er fever and I relaxed the ban. My mistake. The abysmal quality of the officiating, the rah rah announcing teams and worst of all no honey spotting. I was right the first time.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
I am kind of surprised at this post and at many of the responses here. jaydee007 has the link to the actual situation, if you want to know the real situation.

The reason for my surprise is that all of you should be familiar with the concept that the media takes stories out of context for their own purposes to create a media frenzy. Before jumping all over Richard, you should at least be informed of the reality of the event. Both Richard and Crabtree were mic'd up, and you can see the situation in jaydee007's link.

Following the game, Richard went over to Crabtree and held out his hand to shake Crabtree's hand, and said, "Great game! Great game!" Crabtree then pushed Richard's hand away and slapped Richard in the face.

Richard then went around the field and shook hands with and hugged and congratulated a number of 49ers.

After his tirade, where he did go waaaaay over a line, he has apologized to his team and to his community (of which I am a proud member and fan).

Perhaps the message the sports mom above would like to teach her kids is that Crabtree behaved abominably after the game (but has basically gone untouched because that does not fit the media message) and that Richard, after getting dissed and slapped by Crabtree, lost it for a bit but since then has made his apologies all around.

I have not yet heard any apologies from Crabtree to Richard, or to the Seattle community, or to football fans in general. Sadly, I don't expect to, nor do I expect the national media to portray the story accurately when their narrative attracts so much more attention.

PLEASE WATCH THE LINK THAT JAYDEE007 has posted from KIRO TV, starting at 2:55.
(show less)
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
What nonsense. Sherman made a bee-line for Crabtree to shake his hand for one reason: to humiliate him, and Crabtree knew it. Secondly, the reason Sherman apologized was because of the larger culture around him, not because he realized on his own he'd done wrong.

And that sad TV clip doesn't show what got Sherman his unsportsmanlike taunting penalty - making a choking gesture to the SF quarterback. Why did this revealing video leave that out? And why did Sherman throw Kaepernick the choke sign? Well, Kaepernick had the audacity to throw the ball in Sherman's direction; a sure sign of disrespecting Sherman. If that's not thug attitude there is no such thing. Sherman's a joke right out of a stereotype factory and his attitude is as common as dirt right around this country.

Let's do this the other way. Let's say Sherman's culture rules in this situation. Is there an apology? No. If I'm wrong, then go to Compton and and show me all the apologies after heated discussions, fights and shootings over nothing - respect. The fact is, there shouldn't be a culture of humiliation in the first place. One needs only look at where such a culture exists and where it doesn't to put Sherman in his proper perspective.

If I had 100 dollars for every time I've heard "He disrespected me" I'd be living on my own island. Enough with the chest-thumping, lion roars, stupid dances and intimidating stares. I find it boring in sports and it is positively dangerous in real life, as if an NFL player in jail for murder doesn't point that up. Sherman humiliated Crabtree and apologized cuz someone tapped him on the shoulder. NFL players get caught with guns all the time. Why? What sane millionaire runs around with illegal weapons?
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
This article has left out commentary on the impact the out of control child/adult has on the other members of a team. A disrespectful youngster who gets tossed from the game for mouthing off to an umpire or referee not only loses his/her chance to help the team, he/she hurts the other team members in their pursuit of winning or whatever their goal may be. Parents who cover for the subsequent excuses that the youngster may make for his/her behavior surely must be held accountable as well. The Mom or Dad who blames someone else for their problems probably has a youngster that makes excuses as well. Great article and I have shared it with my son's hockey team parents and coach.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Putting,

We saw this so many times and it broke our hearts because we could see the trajectory of this kind of behavior (and we saw it get progressively worse as the kids got older). And just as a more immediate effect, a lot of kids just drop out of sports altogether because of this type of behavior by the parents and kids, which is sad. I don't agree with rules that force parents to sit silently in the stands, but there is certain abusive behavior that should not be tolerated.
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
Stoicism may be admired today, but it will never achieve anything Great!
Period!
43 weeks ago
43 weeks ago Link To Comment
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