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I call it “Big Sorry”: the veritable industry that’s grown up around the public apology.

As Ann Coulter pointed out recently, the time has long passed for entertainers and others in the public eye to quit feeding the apology monster:

Bullying is the essence of politics for the left. They bully those they disdain, like Palin, with adolescent insults. They bully everyone with the threat of losing a career because of a word. (…)

That isn’t the rule of law; it’s the rule of bullies.

Conservatives believe people have a right to be left alone, whether from the word police, the government or delusional nuts, no matter how much they want “closure.”

Coulter is right.

As distressing as they can be, it’s not the foul-mouthed tirades of Martin Bashir or Alec Baldwin that are fraying the fragile bonds of an already divided society.

It’s the counterproductive way we “handle” these “controversial” events today:

We demand (a usually insincere) apology, often on behalf of a supposedly aggrieved “community.”

These apologies reinforce truly toxic notions, such as the very existence of “group rights,” and that free born citizens should “watch what they say” lest they lose their livelihoods at the whim of stuck up, self-appointed word police.

From Canada’s Guy Earle to more familiar names like Gilbert Gottfried, stand-up comedians have been a favorite target of these “Big Sorry” bullies.

Erik Griffin doesn’t plan to be one of them.