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A Programming Sutra

This is the way I heard it. (That’s the way all sutras start.) Long long ago — about 1997 and I’m not naming names to protect the innocent and because I figure the statute of limitations is up for the guilty, and the company I’m going to talk about has been through bankruptcy and several acquisitions so it’s not the same company anyway — a major toy retailer ToysForKids (TFK) with stores in malls all over America heard about this nifty new thing called “the web.” As I heard the story, two programmers in IT had the idea that TFK should be selling toys on the internet. They got permission to do a sort of side project, semi-bootleg, to build a demonstration e-commerce web site, ToysForKids.com. (By the way, that domain name is now owned by a domain-squatter in Hong Kong called “iGenesis Limited”, but then ToysForKids never existed anyway.)

They built the web site on a desktop server using a scripting language called tcl, and demonstrated it. It looked so good they got permission to take it live, and they happily started making dozens of sales a day with it. It really was a lovely site, too, won lots of awards.

The CIO was so pleased that he arranged a demo for the CEO. The CEO was so pleased that he arranged a big advertising buy for Thanksgiving Day during the football game — as I recall, $50 million — so that everyone would know about the new ToysForKids.com.

Everyone did. And everyone’s mom, wife, and girlfriend that had a computer went and tried to start their Christmas Shopping sometime in the first quarter.

Now, remember this is 15 years ago. The desktop server they were using wouldn’t make a good iPad now, and the Internet connection, while good for the time, had less capacity than Comcast promises me.

And everyone who was bored with football and had computer access was trying to use it. The site pretty much melted down; it wasn’t long before the programmers had found different jobs, the CIO wanted to spend more time with his family, and the CEO, um, retired.