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Stop Medicating Type II Diabetes and Other Lifestyle Diseases

Excavating nuggets of wisdom from Jordan S. Rubin's The Maker's Diet.

by
Rhonda Robinson

Bio

September 24, 2013 - 1:00 pm
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screamingchild

Our 25-year friendship ended in a hospital bed — after a double amputation. Her heart, they said, simply stopped beating.

Although she had ten years on me, Mary and I shared something in common that perplexed us daily — our rambunctious little boys. As a baby, hers would crawl around on the floor looking for cords to yank. The louder the lamp would crash the more it delighted him. Mine was a happy little guy that walked every edge he could find, and crossed every line I drew. To no one’s surprise, they also became instant friends.

After a long morning of shopping together, we sat down hoping to relax and enjoy a little quiet, a cup of coffee and some grown-up conversation. It didn’t happen. Instead, her four-year-old boy began to run in circles. Up over the chairs, across the couch rounding the coffee table and back again. Over and over, around and around he went, howling at the top of his lungs. This went on for what seemed like an hour. He couldn’t stop.

This was bad behavior, even for this kid. The year was 1981. If ADHD was invented then, we hadn’t heard of it. It was also long before it was popular to look anywhere other than a pyramid for nutrition. Mary traced his behavior back to a red Kool-Aid and a hot dog lunch and a sugar cookie for dessert.

Few people, at that time if any, were correlating behavior with diet in children. She didn’t look for an excuse for his behavior — she looked for a catalyst. Through trial and error this mother found what foods would transform her boisterous little boy into an uncontrollable little monster. The most obvious offenders were dyes, sugar and any processed foods.

What Mary knew so many years ago, is almost common knowledge among mothers today. What Mary didn’t know, what Jordan S. Rubin explains in his book The Maker’s Diet just might have saved her life.

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All Comments   (6)
All Comments   (6)
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"Nor are you persuaded by my year of columns on this very subject. Nor the hundreds of papers I've read, many of which I've quoted in my column. Nor are you persuaded by the fact that you're describing something close to the same diet I've been following for a yer, which has also reduced *my* blood sugar fairly dramatically."

No. You're right. When you are lying in a hospital bed fighting to keep your legs you don't have time to "experiment." You need answers from people that have a track record of success. We hired such people-- followed their advice to this day.

I'm no longer looking for answers, we found healing and health. What I am exploring in this series, are authors that have also found success and deepened their faith.

I don't expect you to agree. However, I didn't expect you to act like a troll either.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
My mother in law was able to successfully overcome her Type II diabetes with a stringent low carb, low sugar diet - i.e. all carbs coming from vegetables, not white/processed foods. Well Being Journal just ran a 3 part series on diabetic diets indicating that diets high in good fats (extra virgin olive oil, avocado, etc.) and low in carbs resulted in greater control, less medication, and even reversal of Type II diabetes. Oddly enough, the ADA has been slow to catch on (http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/b/2011/03/07/is-the-ada-shifting-its-stance-about-carbs.htm). Bottom line: Your body is made up of careful chemistry - carbs convert to sugar, making them the #1 enemy of diabetics. Rubin is right - we've been trained to live on a high carb diet in this country and, depending on our genetics, it is killing us.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
"What is diabetes? It is essentially a disorder of the body's ability to process carbohydrates."

It sure seems like a no brainer. The feeling we kept getting was that they just wanted us to be comfortable with it all. Just do all things in moderation--so we can just keep the diabetes and not die? But keep a very high priced industry in full swing? Sheesh.

I think most medical professionals assume that if you are over weight, you don't have what it takes to change. That's a shame. Never under estimate the power of the human spirit.

Thanks for the link--- they'll figure it out eventually.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Okay, I'm sorry, but this is just stupid. Certainly T2DM can be ameliorated with a diet change, that's how I took my A1c down 20 percent. But as soon as you start eating more carbs again, your blood sugar is going to go back up. But it doesn't go away.

And no, eating kosher doesn't make you healthier.

This is quackery.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
"This is quackery."

You are certainly entitled to your opinion Mr. Martin. However, the nutritionist that changed our diet as well as the doctors that have cleared him of diabetes would say otherwise. After just three months, he was completely insulin free-- and has remained so for over 8 months now. As a bonus he's over 100 pounds lighter and maintaining his weight without strenuous exercise or starvation. So I'm sure you'll forgive me if I'm not persuaded by your simple comment.

"But as soon as you start eating more carbs again..."

You can continue to hit your head against the wall, complain that it's there, and take aspirin for the pain.

However, my recommendation is that if you ever decide to stop, once the bruising is gone and the pain is just a memory-- use your head for something else. Walls are also very handy and useful if you use them for what there were intended.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
Nor are you persuaded by my year of columns on this very subject. Nor the hundreds of papers I've read, many of which I've quoted in my column. Nor are you persuaded by the fact that you're describing something close to the same diet I've been following for a yer, which has also reduced *my* blood sugar fairly dramatically.

Nor, for that matter, have you troubled to even defend this silly notion that Jews were immune to pneumonic plague, which is just flat untrue. Not true. False.

Which is fine, you're entitled to your opinion too. But it's quackery, pure and simple.
51 weeks ago
51 weeks ago Link To Comment
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