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From Rapey to Righteous: Can Robin Thicke’s Controversial Hit Song ‘Blurred Lines’ Elevate the Culture?

If happily married stars would promote happy marriages, the culture might begin to recover.

by
Megan Fox

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September 8, 2013 - 12:00 pm
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Robin-Thicke-TI-Pharrell-Blurred-Lines-NSFW

Fauxminists everywhere are declaring Robin Thicke’s summer hit “Blurred Lines” rapey and weird:

Basically, the majority of the song … has the R&B singer murmuring “I know you want it” over and over into a girl’s ear. Call me a cynic, but that phrase does not exactly encompass the notion of consent in sexual activity.

As originally written with the rap, yes, it’s gross. So was the video with the naked supermodels, as is most pop music. That is all true. (Someone needs to record the date and time I agreed with a modern feminist. It won’t happen again.)

However, “Blurred Lines” is a serious jam and I can’t help but turn it up and sing along (albeit without the kids in the car). Last week, I wrote about the Miley Cyrus twerking incident which involved Thicke, who really should have known better than to agree to perform a pedophilia fantasy with a barely legal girl in a teddy bear suit. I think we can all agree these are not shining pillars of moral superiority we’re dealing with. The Hollywood crowd seems to be arrested in development somewhere near 15 years of age with a fixation on dick jokes and orgasms.

But something happened with “Blurred Lines” that made it palatable even to this Christian conservative prude: Jimmy Fallon and The Roots rewrote it.

During an episode of Jimmy Fallon’s late night show, he sang a version of “Blurred Lines” with Robin Thicke and The Roots. In this version, The Roots did a freestyle rap in place of the original misogynistic, rapey rap that could be a marriage anthem.

Good girlfriends, I had a few
But the best girlfriend I ever had is you
I thank God for my blessings, it began with you
So I put a ring on it and I married you
Come on and take a ride with me on a avenue
If you see it and you want it, you can have it boo
You have these other girls getting mad at you
Cause you got brains, looks and attitude
Cause my skill line is getting blurrier
I come home to my own Miss America
I mean this ain’t no ordinary love
Go and bring it here to me girl, hurry up
I’m watching, I’m waiting and they not you, so they hating
They just angry cause you ain’t basic
And I’mma give you a standing ovation

When mixed with this message, and seen under the light of married monogamy (Robin Thicke is married), the other lyrics fall nicely into a pretty hot love song. If seen in the context of husband speaking to wife, the lyric “I know you want it…let me liberate ya” becomes funny and inevitable. I mean, ladies, when your husband is being cute and complimenting you (“You the hottest b**** in this place!”), don’t tell me your answer to “I know you want it” is: “Not really” — and if it is, why did you marry him?

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All Comments   (16)
All Comments   (16)
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its a catchy song that people pay way to much attention to. and i got no problem with bootynekkid supermodels. its a 'peppe le pew' song nothing more. and while i understand music can lead to bad habits without proper guidence, i also dont want to live in barneyland either. femizazis and prudes are giving more attention and power to this song than it deserves
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well said, Verboten Thoughts.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Apologizing in advance and meaning no offence, I can't understand why intelligent people would pay so much attention to this drivel. The people who produce the pop cultural products are not artists in any sense of the word and they don't elevate or contribute anything to one's personal growth. They scrape the bottom of the human experience in order to make money. And the more enlightened among them laugh at those who buy their stuff.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
The only thing I know about this Robin Thicke is that he had his hand on some fan's fanny a few days ago.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't like Thicke, he's creepy creepy. And I don't understand if those are the lyrics to his song or to another one that Jimmy Fallon wrote? I'm that pop music illiterate.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Do a little research. Robin Thicke is a known hound dog and, like his father, likes them young. His "family friendly" appearance is a total fraud.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
He was definitely in violation of xkcd's "Creep Factor"
http://xkcd.com/314/
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't know anything about him except that he's married with a child. He very well may be a total jerk...in fact it's probably likely. The point is, many stars like him who choose marriage and family for themselves still hawk single promiscuity as if they aren't married. I can't think of one married star who advocates for marriage (especially in the music arena). For those who say "pop music doesn't matter" and "stop paying attention to it" you're wrong. It matters a great deal if we are going to do anything about the culture we are in. Popular culture matters because it is a thermometer of where we are and where we are going and right now that's nowhere good. We need to pay attention and care about pop culture and do our best to influence it positively.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
"I can't think of one married star who advocates for marriage (especially in the music arena)"
Not since The Who, anyway.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
The rap part is rewritten by The Roots. The other lyrics are Thicke's. In the original rap, which I didn't want to reprint because it is so offensive and vulgar, are the rapey parts of the song. I also find him creepy...I don't want to misconstrue that. He's just like the rest of them, using his talents to demean sex and prostitute women. My point is, he could be so much better and I don't understand why he chooses to aim for the bottom.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Would you be asking this question if he was a black rapper like Kanye West? Or are you just shocked because his dad played TV psychologist? It's a serious question. He looks like a decent guy, wife, kid, clean cut and successful, but make no mistake, he's a big ol' attention seeking Hollywood egomaniac who stole this tune from Marvin Gaye. And how do you know what kind of marriage he really has? My guess is it doesn't look like yours.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Not shocked at all. I don't think at any point I mentioned being shocked. I have no idea what his marriage looks like except that he and his wife have said and continue to say they are happy. In that case, if that is true, then why don't married stars advocate for the choices they make? I can't even respond to the race issue. If Kanye West had a hit song that had overtaken the world the way "Blurred Lines" has and inspired the commentary about "rapey" lyrics, I would be writing about it.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
You do appear 'shocked' that he's not advocating marriage in his music, whether you realize it or not.

"Thicke knows well the best thing about being married is the relief of not worrying about “blurred lines” and those complicated pick-ups and hook-ups where one of you might be unexpectedly served with a summons. His lyric “I hate these blurred lines” can be seen as a cry for monogamy..."

My guess is that the opposite it true. Like I said, I doubt his marriage looks like yours. He appears to be uninterested in monogamy.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
The video was more (unintentionally) funny than rapey - I haven't seen that many "silly walks" since the old Monty Python skit. I can't believe they didn't put John Cleese in it!!

The "demean sex and prostitute women" thing, however, is the natural and probable consequence of 40+ years of feminism. Western "gender roles" were in place to PROTECT women from this stuff, not to oppress them. That protection did come at a cost, as women were denied the "right" to a consequence-free indulgence of their every whim.

Actions have consequences, and feminists were too dense to realize that men also had many victorian cultural constraints. It was part of the social contract - men and women were supposed to behave in a manner beneficial to each other's bona-fide needs. When women tore up that social contract, men eventually quit honoring it too. Hence "Blurred Lines." A PC re-write of the song does nothing to fix the root of the problem - our broken social contract. When women behave badly, men will too. It's called "consequences."


31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
the john cleese thing was a nice touch...agreed.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
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