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Want to Lose Eight Pounds in Five Days?

It's easy. Just gain 10 the week before. And maybe that's okay.

by
Charlie Martin

Bio

July 6, 2013 - 2:00 pm
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The truth is that it’s been, in general, kind of a sucky week.

I’ll talk about it more in the Buddhism column tomorrow, since it coincidentally — or was it? he says, as the spooky music rises — fits really well with talking about the Second and Third Noble Truths, but I’ve been off work all week on vacation, and had all sorts of aspirations for the week, many of which went unrealized. I really haven’t managed a fast day, and I’ve been back very close to my old low-carb diet, and I’ve had a certain amount of drama around my “new” car, and I haven’t written as much as I hoped to.

And I’ve lost at least eight of the “ten freaking pounds” I gained last week.

Sometimes I think it’s all just an illusion of control.

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Top Rated Comments   
Of course it's okay to be a Martian. It's also okay to be human.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Great article. I know that you make more of a difference than you can possibly know. It baffles me as to why you sometimes feel incompetent and stupid because you are anything BUT! Then again I hear of the anorexics who see themselves as fat. The mind is a difficult thing to understand. For what it's worth, you've made a huge difference in my life. <3
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
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Being martian is okay, no smart-alecky hasenpfeffer lounging about, is there?
39 weeks ago
39 weeks ago Link To Comment
Perfection vs. moderation/balance: why do we imperfect humans expect perfect results from imperfect intake of imperfect food processed by an imperfect body? It's proof of our imperfections. Improvement is a worthy goal, but not perfection. Some of us are wired for perfectionism, but we can't even definite it when it comes to health. Moderation will relieve most misery, if we allow it.

On the other hand, there is often room for improvement when it comes to diet, exercise and weight management; but, perfection doesn't need to be the goal. Our bodies will likely let us know when we have achieved a basic optimal health.

If we need additional support, go for it. My wife (www.abenewjourney.com) used it and it has paid off immensely and we are all the better for it. Improved and improving, yes; perfect, don't know and don't care. She is hearing from her body in ways that let her know is getting close enough.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
For a guy who I thought was writing clear articles close enough to my own diet experience to be helpful I find you are writing really helpful articles ranging from intelligence to Buddhism. I particularly enjoyed your humility in this column. I don't have the same struggle with weight that you do, but I have similar struggles of my own. So thank you. ;-)
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Thank you. You know, one of the things about writing these 13 weeks columns in particular is that people like you reply, and I feel like less of a martian.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Charlie,
You had a self-described very low birth weight; yet uncharacteristic for that prelude (an average 4 point lower IQ) you had a prodigial mind. The prodigy has higher attention control with their pre-frontal/parietal lobes synchronizing to execute their "working" memory. The prodigy combines this with a exceptional forward attention with their cerebellum serving as the controller.
Choline polymorphism of your mother's gene Phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) may be the reason. PEMT codes for making choline & affects how, in this case, your mother experienced an elevated response to her estrogen by the PEMT gene promoter. The result was she had elevated choline levels.
Choline can be made into acetyl-choline, a neuro-transmitter that is also integral to cell membrane signalling. Excess acetyl-choline trims the spines of the brain neural striatum. Symptoms that indicate elevated acetyl-choline are, among other quirks, excess salivation, teary eyes & even tremors.
Without enough of the enzyme actyl-choline-esterase to cleaves acetyl-choline the result is that cerebral levels of acetyl-choline outside of the brain cells rises - but the enzyme must work tagged to a protein called the proline rich membrane anchor (PRIMA). If the genetics of that enzyme is too low then PRIMA can still work with the enzyme butyryl-cholin-esterase in the developing the brain.
My supposition is that your exceptional choline supplied brain developed in tandem with higher than normal PRIMA protein expression; starting while in the womb. This factor gave extra ordinary shepherding of acetyl-choline levels & supper levels of choline for brain development. I will skip over tracing the brain's pre-natal & post-natal developmental neurology.
Sure, your diabetes includes messed up acetyl-choline dynamics (not detailed here). But look at what your brain apparently missed, despite low birth weight.
Pregnant women by week 36 to week 40 can have ~ 3,520 microMol of choline bound to phospholipids. This is as opposed to adult women who are not pregnant having an average of 2,780 microMol bound choline.
Pregnant women's rise in estrogen triggers the rise in choline. Even free choline in pregnant women is higher (~16.5 mMol to non-pregnant women's ~10.7 mMol).
Two hospital's research data showed that premature low birth weight babies (avg. gestation 27 - 29 weeks when delivered) had vein phospholipid bound choline of 1,366.8 +/-339 mMol. While the normally born babies when they are 20 (+/- 12) weeks old have vein phopholipid bound choline of between 1,005 (+/-297) ; other hospital measured this 1,121 (+/- 290) mMol. (As for the hospitals' data on all mothers their average phospholipid bound choline range was 2,592 (+/- 584) mMol - but they weren't birthing prodigies.)
The premies free vein choline at birth was 22 (+/-6) mMol. The normal babies free vein choline in 1 hospital was 28 (+/- 13) mMol. Notably the mother's free choline, unlike bound choline, tended to match their normal born infants level of free choline.
The hospitals gave the premies total parenteral nutrition & their phospholipid bound choline rose to 2,252 (+/- 687) mMol; once premie got to full feeding that parameter of bound choline dropped to 2,073 (+/- 541) mMol.
However, the premies on total parenteral nutrition free vein choline dropped to 18 (+/- 5) mMol. When premies finally advanced to full feeding their free vein choline rose back to just barely above what born with at 23 (+/-9) mMol free choline.
I surmise your free choline, despite self described very low birth weight, thanks to mom was not low like premies deal with. Furthermore, thanks to efficient cleaving of acetyl-choline , it is probable that your free choline did not drop when (if) you were sustained on total parenteral nutrition. You had extra choline for pre & post natal brain development.



40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
*blink*

Hm. Okay, that is interesting. I've also got a peculiarly retentive memory, and oddly am pretty significantly dyscalculic (which I finally resolved with help in grad school). Spent 24 hours on O2 at birth as well, they had troubles getting my lungs working right.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Of course it's okay to be a Martian. It's also okay to be human.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Great article. I know that you make more of a difference than you can possibly know. It baffles me as to why you sometimes feel incompetent and stupid because you are anything BUT! Then again I hear of the anorexics who see themselves as fat. The mind is a difficult thing to understand. For what it's worth, you've made a huge difference in my life. <3
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
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