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Ed Driscoll

“In a move out of Orwell or the Soviet Union, television shows are being asked to include propaganda about ObamaCare,” Kyle Smith writes in the New York Post:

Earlier this month, the California Endowment nonprofit granted $500,000 to a USC Annenberg Norman Lear Center program, “in the latest push to get Tinseltown to promote President Obama’s Affordable Care Act,” Deadline reported.

A flack for the disturbingly titled Hollywood Health & Society program said, with no apparent shame, that “Our experience has shown that the public gets just as much, if not more, information about current events and important issues from their favorite television shows and characters as they do from the news media . . . This grant will allow us to ensure that industry practitioners have up-to-date, relevant facts on health care reform to integrate into their storylines and projects.”

Among those who sit on Hollywood Health & Society’s board are the showrunner of the Disney Junior cartoon “Doc McStuffins” and “Under the Dome” chief Neal Baer.

Now we’re all living under the ObamaCare dome: Even when you flick on a thriller or a kiddie show, there will be no escaping the message that the Affordable Care Act is really, really affordable and super-especially caring.

Hollywood Health & Society has been active for years — it got a storyline about chlamydia inserted into a 2007 episode of “House” and on “ER” worked into the script mentions of the importance of a surgical checklist and BRCA (the gene mutation linked to breast cancer).

Decades ago, the AMA used to vet shows like “Marcus Welby, M.D.”

But no one is pro-breast cancer, whereas ObamaCare is controversial.

Once Hollywood is eagerly chewing up and regurgitating White House talking points like a mama bird feeding us, its innocent little chicks, where does it end?

As spotted by Michael Warren of the Weekly Standard, who asks, “Will the Obamacare revolution be televised?”

I believe PJTV’s own Alfonzo Rachel definitively answered that question, back in 2010:

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Check out "Parade's End" with Benjamen Cumberbach.... besides having incredible lighting and stunning videography work that is far superior to what one would expect for a British period drama, the political commentary is a bit surprising.
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