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Ed Driscoll

Springtime For Durbin

June 19th, 2005 - 10:48 am

Mark Steyn is really knows how to punch those keys — especially when given a subject like Sen. Dick Durbin. Durbin is the Democrat’s Senator from Illinois, and the following essay appears in today’s Chicago Sun Times:

Throughout the last campaign season, senior Democrats had a standard line in their speeches, usually delivered with righteous anger, about how “nobody has a right to question my patriotism!” Given that nobody was questioning their patriotism, it seemed an odd thing to harp on about. But, aware of their touchiness on the subject, I hasten to add that in what follows I am not questioning Dick Durbin’s patriotism, at least not for the first couple of paragraphs. Instead, I’ll begin by questioning his sanity.

Steyn’s just getting warmed up, adding “give Durbin credit” though:

Every third-rate hack on every European newspaper can do the Americans-are-Nazis schtick. Amnesty International has already declared Guantanamo the “gulag of our times.” But I do believe the senator is the first to compare the U.S. armed forces with the blood-drenched thugs of Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge. Way to go, senator! If you had a dime for every crackpot Web site that takes up your thoughtful historical comparison, you’d be able to retire to the Caribbean and spend the rest of your days torturing yourself with hot weather and loud music, as well as inappropriately provocative women and insufficient choice of hors d’oeuvres and all the other shameful atrocities committed at Guantanamo.

Just for the record, some 15 million to 30 million Soviets died in the gulag; some 6 million Jews died in the Nazi camps; some 2 million Cambodians — one third of the population — died in the killing fields. Nobody’s died in Gitmo, not even from having Christina Aguilera played to them excessively loudly. The comparison is deranged, and deeply insulting not just to the U.S. military but to the millions of relatives of those dead Russians, Jews and Cambodians, who, unlike Durbin, know what real atrocities are. Had Durbin said, “Why, these atrocities are so terrible you would almost believe it was an account of the activities of my distinguished colleague Robert C. Byrd’s fellow Klansmen,” that would have been a little closer to the ballpark but still way out.

One measure of a civilized society is that words mean something: “Soviet” and “Nazi” and “Pol Pot” cannot equate to Guantanamo unless you’ve become utterly unmoored from reality. Spot the odd one out: 1) mass starvation; 2) gas chambers; 3) mountains of skulls; 4) lousy infidel pop music turned up to full volume. One of these is not the same as the others, and Durbin doesn’t have the excuse that he’s some airhead celeb or an Ivy League professor. He’s the second-ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Don’t they have an insanity clause?

Now let us turn to the ranking Democrat, the big cheese on the committee, Patrick Leahy of Vermont. Leahy thinks Gitmo needs to be closed down and argues as follows:

“America was once very rightly viewed as a leader in human rights and the rule of law, but Guantanamo has drained our leadership, our credibility, and the world’s good will for America at alarming rates.”

So, until Guantanamo, America was “viewed as a leader in human rights”? Not in 2004, when Abu Ghraib was the atrocity du jour. Not in 2003, when every humanitarian organization on the planet was predicting the deaths of millions of Iraqis from cholera, dysentery and other diseases caused by America’s “war for oil.” Not in 2002, when the “human rights” lobby filled the streets of Vancouver and London and Rome and Sydney to protest the Bushitler’s plans to end the benign reign of good King Saddam. Not the weekend before 9/11 when the human rights grandees of the U.N. “anti-racism” conference met in South Africa to demand America pay reparations for the Rwandan genocide and to cheer Robert Mugabe to the rafters for calling on Britain and America to “apologize unreservedly for their crimes against humanity.” If you close Gitmo tomorrow, the world’s anti-Americans will look around and within 48 hours alight on something else for Gulag of the Week.

And this is where it’s time to question Durbin’s patriotism. As Leahy implicitly acknowledges, Guantanamo is about “image” and “perception” — about how others see America. If this one small camp of a few hundred people has “drained the world’s good will,” whose fault is that?

Read the rest.

Also in the Chicago Sun-Times today is this staggering piece of irony:

Six months ago, Senate Democrats picked Durbin (D-Ill.) to be their No. 2 leader because he is one of the most articulate and informed senators on his side of the aisle.

Orrin Judd’s link to this piece is titled, “Cruel, But True”.

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