Roger L. Simon

Cognitive Dissonance from Senator Feingold

Sen. Russ Feingold’s screed regarding Bush’s speech last night is one of the purest examples of the reason people like me have deserted the Democratic Party:

With the country listening, the President had the chance to finally give our troops and the American public some sense of when he believes this conflict in Iraq will be over and when our brave men and women in uniform will come home.

Earth-to-Feingold, Bush does not want to state WHEN (sorry for the caps but they are necessary in this rare case) our troops will come home because, as he has repeated again and again, that would put them and their Iraqi colleagues in harm’s way and also tell the Baathists and Islamofacists (remember them?) what we are up to and allow them to wait and take over Iraq. Also, anyone with the slightest intelligence realizes that it is impossible to tell at this juncture when the Iraqi government forces will be prepared to defend themselves against the fascists. When they are, we will go. (Bush made that perfectly clear too when he said “When they stand up, we will stand down.”)

Nevertheless, the fuddy-duddy Senator Feingold goes on attacking Bush for his lack of “candor”:

Instead, the President urged us to remember the lessons of 9/11. But it is with those lessons in mind that I oppose the Administration’s current approach to Iraq. The President keeps talking about staying the course, but what the American people really want is candor and clarity about where this course is taking us.

I have introduced a resolution calling for the President to provide a public report clarifying the mission that the U.S. military is being asked to accomplish in Iraq and laying out a plan and timeframe for accomplishing that mission.

Should we send that timeframe to Zarkawi, Senator, or directly to Bin Laden himself?… Okay, say it loud and say it proud: Buchanan and Feingold in ‘O8!

UPDATE: It may be of interest to Sen. Feingold… though I somehow doubt it… that Omar, writing from Baghdad, says this of the current discussion:

It’s visible to everyone that debates over the war in Iraq, war on terror, invasion or occupation or whatever you may name it are at peak levels right now. The process is being questioned, criticized and discussed more profoundly than at any time in the last two years but you know what? That’s not happening in Iraq; you can find such discussions and accusations in America but you can’t find them in Iraq.

Wonder why, Senator Feingold? Think about it.

The posts, by Feingold and by Omar, are indeed remarkable to compare.