News & Politics

Feminists Get Faith-Based Posters Removed From Langley Air Force Base

The military should be the one place immune from the prattling of social justice crusaders. After all, their mission is simple and straightforward: defend this country against any and all enemies.

Considering the state of the world these days, that’s a tall order. That simple yet profound mission isn’t enough for the social justice warriors who seek to interfere with real warriors and how they do their business:

The Air Force has removed several “faith-based” posters from a display at Langley Air Force Base to appease a group of hysterical feminists who got their pantyhose in a twist over what they called “sexist, male-supremacist language.”

Before we go any further, it’s important to understand the offending passage on the poster was first published in a 1955 Air Force manual.

“Men cannot live without faith except for brief moments of anarchy or despair,” one poster read. “Faith leads to conviction — and convictions lead to actions. It is only a man of deep convictions, a man of deep faith, who will make the sacrifices needed to save his manhood.

It is obvious that our enemy will attack us at our weakest spot. The hole in our armor is our lack of faith. We need to revive a fighting faith by which we can live, and for which we would be willing even to die.”

The words the National Organization for Women found most egregious were “man”, “men” and “manhood.”

“The passages glorify the military’s reliance on male dominance, stating without equivocation that ‘It is only a man of deep convictions, a man of deep faith, who will make the sacrifices needed to save his manhood,” wrote NOW president Terry O’Neill in a letter to Gen. Herbert Carlisle.

In addition to the legacy of where the offending phrases came from, let’s bear in mind that fewer than 20 percent of the Air Force are women. Let’s also bear in mind that NOW wasn’t the first organization to try to pressure officials into removing the posters.

Previously, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation sought to yank the posters, arguing that they showed a preference for religious personnel over atheists. The Air Force rejected those arguments, probably out of their sheer stupidity, but then the feminists got involved.

The United States Armed Forces, after a perception for years that women are treated as second-class citizens within the ranks due to a multitude of news stories alleging sexual harassment and assault, is a little gun-shy about being seen as anti-woman, so they caved faster than the French.

Wait, are the French a protected class yet?