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Disney and the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, Part 5: 'It Says Something Very Nice'

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Welcome to Part 5 of our series on Walt Disney's contributions to the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York City. If you need to catch up on the rest of the series, here's where to look:

Part 1: ‘The Kind Of Service We Can Offer’

Part 2: ‘Something No One Has Seen Or Done Before’

Part 3: ‘I Won’t Open The Fair Without That Exhibit!’

Part 4: ‘At The Intersection Of Commerce And Progress’

This week we're looking at an attraction that made its debut at the World's Fair and is still beloved today - It's A Small World. It's one of the attractions that appears at every Disney resort, on three continents. Because of its ubiquity all over the world, according to Disney, the title song "is always playing somewhere around the world." During the course of a 16 hour day in any one of the parks, the song plays 1,200 times. Love it or hate it, It's A Small World is one of the quintessential Disney attractions, but it almost didn't make it off the drawing board.

A scant nine months before the Fair, Pepsi approached the Disney Studios requesting that the Imagineers develop an attraction that the company would sponsor to benefit UNICEF. Bob Thomas picks up the story in Walt Disney: An American Original:

A Disney executive, believing that three projects were more than enough to occupy WED, sent the Pepsi-Cola people to an engineering firm that specialized in children's playgrounds. Walt was angry when he heard about it. "I'm the one who makes those decisions!" he declared. "Tell Pepsi I'll do it!"

Walt detailed to stunned Imagineers his plan for "a little boat ride" in which guests would see simple, childlike figures representing the cultures all over the globe. He enlisted some of his most trusted artists to design the attraction. Mary Blair, whom Walt called his "favorite artist," imprinted her unique stamp on the look of the ride. Marc Davis oversaw the animatronics, while his wife Alice and Joyce Carlson designed the costumes for the dolls. Claude Coats engineered the layout of what Walt would call "the happiest cruise that ever sailed."