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'60 Minutes' Whitewashes Massive FBI Failure in 2015 ISIS Texas Terror Attack

"Complexities."

That's the excuse invoked at the end of a 60 Minutes segment that aired Sunday evening to explain why the FBI failed to stop two ISIS-inspired terrorists in direct contact with two ISIS terror recruiters. The attackers rolled up in a car loaded with guns and ammunition to the "Draw Mohammad" cartoon contest event in Garland, Texas, on May 3, 2015:

What 60 Minutes, fronted by Anderson Cooper and echoed in an interview with Seamus Hughes of George Washington University's Program on Extremism, explains is that FBI sources are stretched so thin that there's no possible way to devote resources to every single potential threat.

I'll grant that FBI counter-terrorism resources are overloaded WAY BEYOND capacity. That's an appropriate and warranted discussion for policymakers to address. Also, in the real world of law enforcement, there are indeed many "complexities" during a case that lead to some very important investigative clues being missed -- especially when FBI resources are overstretched beyond capacity.

But these "complexities" don't even remotely begin to explain the massive failure by the FBI in this particular case. Like a blanket that's too short that you can never turn the right way to cover everything, invoking "complexities" to explain the FBI failure in the attempted Garland attack doesn't cover the very issues raised by 60 Minutes in their own report. Yet "complexities" is all that 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper, and Seamus Hughes give viewers.

So here's the real clarity in this story: at the time of the Garland attack, as the two terrorists, Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi, were traveling in their car loaded with guns and ammo, they were being closely tailed by an undercover FBI agent (not an informant -- an actual FBI agent) whom they had previously been in contact with on social media.

The undercover agent even snapped pictures of the attack site just seconds before Simpson and Soofi jumped out of their car with guns blazing:

60 Minutes helpfully provides the undercover FBI agent's picture taken seconds before the attack showing two individuals, including a police officer, who were shot at by the pair:

And they provide a helpful graphic of how close the undercover FBI agent was tailing Simpson and Soofi (see the terrorists' car turning into the Curtis Culwell Center, and the FBI undercover agent following immediately behind):