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We Must Face Up to the Grim Fact that the Teachers We Employ are Losing Patience With Us

“Christians, and those rejecting the me-generation liberal dogma of ‘if it feels good do it,’ are no longer tolerable by the intellectual and cultural elite,” Robert P. George of Princeton notes, as quoted by Ginni Thomas of the Daily Caller:

“Christians, and those rejecting the me-generation liberal dogma of ‘if it feels good do it,’ are no longer tolerable by the intellectual and cultural elite,” says George, 59, director of the James Madison program at Princeton University. Citing the political witch hunt that forced Brendan Eich’s departure as CEO of Mozilla for a small contribution to a conservative political cause, George said politically correct mobs “threaten us with consequences if we refuse to call what is good evil, and what is evil, good. They command us to confirm our thinking to their orthodoxy, or else say nothing at all.”

Yet instead of accepting this liberal cultural dominance, George offers a call to arms with practical advice for the embattled faithful. Encouraging conservatives to model themselves off the early civil rights leaders who clung to noble bedrock free speech principles liberals claim to embrace today, George says “our first and most effective move is to hold these elites to their principles.”

As the late Kenneth Minogue wrote in the New Criterion in the summer of 2010:

My concern with democracy is highly specific. It begins in observing the remarkable fact that, while democracy means a government accountable to the electorate, our rulers now make us accountable to them. Most Western governments hate me smoking, or eating the wrong kind of food, or hunting foxes, or drinking too much, and these are merely the surface disapprovals, the ones that provoke legislation or public campaigns. We also borrow too much money for our personal pleasures, and many of us are very bad parents. Ministers of state have been known to instruct us in elementary matters, such as the importance of reading stories to our children. Again, many of us have unsound views about people of other races, cultures, or religions, and the distribution of our friends does not always correspond, as governments think that it ought, to the cultural diversity of our society. We must face up to the grim fact that the rulers we elect are losing patience with us.

And so are those we employ to educate America's children as well, alas.

Meanwhile, whenever I get a twinge of guilt that I'm getting too out there when quoting articles that compare the quotes of radical Islamists with radical leftists (such as "Mohamed Atta, Socialist Critic of Capitalism," linking to a 2011 article at the American Spectator), radical Islamists are unfortunately all too quick to reinforce that notion: "Anjem Choudary: ‘Muslims must reject the unIslamic ideas of democracy/freedom.’"

Thomas Friedman, Donna Brazile, Harry Reid, and RFK Jr. couldn't have said it better themselves.

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