[Fill In Blank] Industry Furious At Obama

Another week, another sector of American industry angry at the president.

This week, it's the jet industry, according to the Daily Caller:

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPO) President Craig Fuller told The Daily Caller that Obama’s comments have cast a pall over the industry, causing many who were considering buying a plane to back away from making a purchase.

“The industry has suffered terribly in the last two and a half years and it has just started to recover. Most of the signs were starting to look good,” said Fuller. “We are so angry as an industry and we have all come together to try to bring a more fair and balanced description to the debate.”

In response to Obama’s press conference, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) and International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) issued a letter to the president. The two organizations challenged the administration’s rhetoric and recalled a similar instance in which 20,000 IAM workers were laid off as a result of “ill-informed criticism of corporate jets and business aviation” and the 2008 downturn.

“Words have consequences and, in this industry, a few misguided words can put at risk even the ever-so-modest recovery we have experienced,” said IAM International President Tom Buffenbarger. “What this industry and its workforce requires is more time to recover, a chance to book more orders and the opportunity to recall more workers.”

The president himself saw a benefit in providing tax breaks for corporate jets just in the past couple of years, signing two pieces of legislation that contained such provisions: the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the Small Business Lending Fund Act.

Indeed, one of of the greatest perks of being president is flying in the most private jet of all, Air Force One. According to Fuller, Obama has flown Air Force One more than any other president in history.

Nevertheless, the industry has felt Obama’s wrath.

So starting as a presidential candidate, Obama has:

  • Called for bankrupting the coal industry.
  • Raised gas prices by forcing domestic production to a crawl.
  • Demonized bankers and automatic teller machines.
  • Went to war against Fox News, talk radio, and Twitter user Kevin Eder.
  • Alienated Wall Street, which backed him in 2008 -- and will probably do so again.
  • Nationalized the car industry.
  • Forced Chrysler to terminate 25 percent of its auto dealers.
  • Demonized Las Vegas.
  • Alinskyized the Chamber of Commerce.
  • Blocked Boeing from expanding into a Right to Work State.
  • Is busy transforming the insurance industry into the equivalent of quasi-government utilities.
  • Created an uncertain (to say the least) regulatory environment, making new hiring a challenging proposition.
  • And is now Alisnkyizing private planes, despite having temporary custody of the greatest "private" plane of all.

As Doug Ross wrote last fall, “Unlike Tricky Dick Nixon, Obama Wears His Enemies List On His Sleeve.”

Other than ambulance-chasing trial lawyers, leftwing, uber-PC Hollywood, Silicon Valley (where Al Gore sits on the board of Apple), and the would-be builders of the Ground Zero Mosque, is there any sector of American business who isn't furious with Obama? But of course, because of social issues, unionization and sheer inertia, they'll all vote for him next year, right?

Update: And again...

Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPO) President Craig Fuller told The Daily Caller that Obama’s comments have cast a pall over the industry, causing many who were considering buying a plane to back away from making a purchase.

“The industry has suffered terribly in the last two and a half years and it has just started to recover. Most of the signs were starting to look good,” said Fuller. “We are so angry as an industry and we have all come together to try to bring a more fair and balanced description to the debate.”

In response to Obama’s press conference, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) and International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) issued a letter to the president. The two organizations challenged the administration’s rhetoric and recalled a similar instance in which 20,000 IAM workers were laid off as a result of “ill-informed criticism of corporate jets and business aviation” and the 2008 downturn.

“Words have consequences and, in this industry, a few misguided words can put at risk even the ever-so-modest recovery we have experienced,” said IAM International President Tom Buffenbarger. “What this industry and its workforce requires is more time to recover, a chance to book more orders and the opportunity to recall more workers.”

The president himself saw a benefit in providing tax breaks for corporate jets just in the past couple of years, signing two pieces of legislation that contained such provisions: the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the Small Business Lending Fund Act.

Indeed, one of of the greatest perks of being president is flying in the most private jet of all, Air Force One. According to Fuller, Obama has flown Air Force One more than any other president in history.

Nevertheless, the industry has felt Obama’s wrath.