Why Is Talking About Money 'Icky'?

I thought about this question as I read this CNBC article saying that despite an improved optimism on the economy, Trump's poll numbers are down:

"Attitudes about [President Donald] Trump's economy at this point, remain consistent, positive and strong,'' said Micah Roberts, the Republican pollster for CNBC with Public Opinion Strategies. Jay Campbell from Hart Research was the Democratic pollster. The poll was conducted June 9-12 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

The positive economic attitudes aren't doing much to help the president's approval rating, which has fallen to 37 percent in the current survey from 39 percent in April. His approval on the economy has also fallen to just 41 percent from 44 percent in April. And there has been a rise in pessimism, driven by groups such as retirees, blue collar workers and independents, including some core Trump supporters.

It seemed that with Obama, the polling numbers for likability were always in his favor even if people didn't necessarily like his policies (because they often didn't work). For Trump, it seems to be the opposite: people like the policies more than they like the man. Sure, this could just be media bias and to some degree, it probably is. However, I wonder how much the public succumb to cognitive dissonance (the state of having inconsistent thoughts, beliefs, or attitudes, especially as relating to behavioral decisions and attitude change) between how they feel about the economy which basically boils down to how they feel about money and how they should feel about Trump, who they hear is a heartless, gutless soul who focuses too much on money.

It's unpopular to talk about money and Trump epitomizes capitalism and money and therefore is "icky." So, monetarily, things are looking up, but as long as the public hates on Trump, it's okay to feel good about the fact that the U.S. is doing better economically. The media and many leftists push the agenda that money is "icky" and capitalism is evil, but in reality, capitalism lifts more people up than any other economic system. People see the economy improving but they are reluctant to give credit where credit is due.

In order to be liked and supported, people are supposed to believe in climate change, free healthcare, and the redistribution of wealth. But deep down, somewhere, they have to know that a wealthy and free society cannot have an icky view of money. Money is not evil and it is not something to be ignored or feared. It is a tool for the prosperity and a reward for work and production. The left wants the public to feel otherwise. The funny thing is that the more people tell you they don't care about money, the more they do. Or they are being supported or subsidized by someone else and can afford to hold negative views on money.