Governor Bob McDonnell was indicted yesterday for giving favors to a man who loaned him a Ferrari, Rolexes, cash, and jets.  Anyone tempted to give the disgraced governor the benefit of the doubt should read this wrecking ball piece on the indictment from the eminent Bryon York. McDonnell appeared on MSNBC today and defended himself in a press conference.  These unconventional appearances after an indictment have the trappings of a defendant who will have to draw an inside straight to avoid federal prison.  But to beat the wrap, he’ll need cash, lots of it.

Enter the Bob McDonnell “Restoration Fund.”  This email went out to this morning to donors to his campaign:

Friends,

Earlier today former Governor Bob McDonnell released a statement regarding the false indictment built upon discredited witnesses that was filed today in federal court.

Please take time to read below

The Restoration Fund

——-

A MESSAGE FROM FORMER GOVERNOR ROBERT F. MCDONNELL

“My fellow Virginians, earlier today federal prosecutors notified my attorneys that they have filed criminal charges against me and my wife Maureen, alleging that we violated federal law by accepting gifts and loans from Jonnie Williams, the former CEO of Star Scientific. I deeply regret accepting legal gifts and loans from Mr. Williams, all of which have been repaid with interest, and I have apologized for my poor judgment for which I take full responsibility. However, I repeat emphatically that I did nothing illegal for Mr. Williams in exchange for what I believed was his personal generosity and friendship. I never promised – and Mr. Williams and his company never received – any government benefit of any kind from me or my Administration. We did not violate the law, and I will use every available resource and advocate I have for as long as it takes to fight these false allegations, and to prevail against this unjust overreach of the federal government.”

Robert F. McDonnell
Former Governor of Virginia

This looks like a soon-to-be pitch for cash from a legal defense fund. The irony is rich. A government official who finds himself facing federal prison because of cash handouts may be asking for more cash handouts. When will it end?

It won’t end before we are all treated to a photograph of Bob McDonnell driving a Ferrari delivered to him for vacation use from the sugar daddy. The indictment describes Maureen McDonnell emailing the photograph to the sugar daddy, presumably as a thank you for the favor.

It is worth noting that the whole McDonnell mess started to unravel when they treated a chef poorly.  The governor and his spokesmen were quick to throw the chef to the wolves and smear the chef’s reputation.  They reminded reporters that the chef was facing charges for fleecing the governor’s mansion of some food.  How delicious in hindsight — a few hams vs. a Ferrari.

Even McDonnell’s smear of the chef fits in with the pattern described in the federal indictment: McDonnell was willing to bear false witness against a lowly chef, to wreck the chef’s reputation. He was the governor, after all, so who would believe a mere chef?  The power and prestige of the office was leveraged to thrust doubt at the chef’s story of corruption and graft inside the mansion, just as the power and prestige of the office was previously used to snag free golf, hot tub covers, and Rolexes.

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McDonnell’s collapse has another life lesson: when Republicans sell out to the left, they get nothing in return.  I’ve documented for over a year McDonnell’s close work with Soros-funded leftist groups like the Advancement Project.  He even crowed about it on the governor’s website.

McDonnell pushed hard to gain the automatic rights of felons to vote in Virginia.  The left demanded it, and McDonnell thought he could get support in the black and leftist community by adopting their felon-voting cause.

So where is the Advancement Project today? Are they defending McDonnell or doing anything to help his cause? Is the Advancement Project sugar daddy George Soros writing any checks to McDonnell’s “Restoration Fund”?

We’ll find out, because anyone who throws more than $200 at McDonnell’s effort to stay out of prison will have their name disclosed on the IRS 990 tax form.  Anyone can call the Restoration Fund and demand a copy of the 990 form.  It will be interesting to see if McDonnell’s skill at generating cash handouts continues after his indictment.