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The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

Bio

August 12, 2013 - 8:45 am

The Agriculture Department is recruiting college campus “ambassadors” to try to wipe the scourge of 3 a.m. Taco Bell from dorms and make students who often live on ramen noodles eat healthier.

To mark back-t0-school season, the USDA today touted “a number of Department efforts to promote a healthy and productive learning environment.”

“As our youngsters head back to school, USDA is committed to their future,” said Secretary Tom Vilsack. “We are taking new steps to expand rural education opportunities, ensure healthy and safe food for young people, and giving parents and teachers the tools and information they need to help our kids grow up ready to lead the world.”

This includes the MyPlate Kids Place for children ages 8 to 12, “which can also help parents and educators make better and healthier food choices” with “games, activity sheets, recipes and tips.”

The USDA has also launched the MyPlate on Campus partnership “to recruit college-age students to become campus MyPlate ambassadors.”

“These ambassadors will lead their campus community to encourage healthy eating and more physical activity,” USDA said.

New rules are also being phased in for schools regarding foods that are allowed to be sold, including snacks.

Citing packed lunches as a source of foodborne illness, the department is also launching an educational program for parents who choose to send their kid to school with a brown-bag lunch.

“USDA is also helping inside the classroom. USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and the American Statistical Association (ASA) are preparing to present a new Census at School Food Preference Survey lesson plan and activities for students in grades 5 to 8. This new curriculum teaches statistical and agricultural literacy to children through common core standards in Mathematics, Language Arts, Nutrition, Social Studies, and Family Consumer Sciences,” the department added.

Bridget Johnson is a career journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

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Top Rated Comments   
First, what does harassing adults about food choices have to do with agriculture?
Second, if the USDA has enough money to do this, they've got too much money.
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (7)
All Comments   (7)
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The continuing infantilization of society. At least when I was in school we had real narcs. Not food narcs.
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
Of course we should discourage 3am Taco Bell runs..... Everyone knows the cool kids go to Whataburger for a #5 with a large Dr. Pepper.....
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
What the devil does this have to do with agriculture? Is Nanny Vilsack going to cut their Tofurkey cutlet into small pieces for them, too?
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mmmmmmmmmmm, Taco Bell ... I had that Doritos taco thing, and man was that good! It was so junk-foody and unctuous ... maybe that's my supper plan tonight ... mmmmmmmmmmmm.
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
Oh my, you said Brown Bag, That's Raaacissssst!
All kidding aside, leave my lunch alone. You eat what you want I'll eat what I want!
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
I wish the federal government paid as much attention to creating jobs as it does forcing kids to eat stuff they don't want to eat.
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
First, what does harassing adults about food choices have to do with agriculture?
Second, if the USDA has enough money to do this, they've got too much money.
35 weeks ago
35 weeks ago Link To Comment
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