Wednesday night the leftwing group Battleground Texas tried to tweet a gotcha attack on Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott. The Conservative Hispanic Society today responds to Battleground Texas with a strong statement that it emailed to me this morning.

CHS applauds AG Abbott for his response to the extreme left-wing group Battleground Texas.  We understand that language can be a barrier in informing some of the destructive power of liberal thought and ideology. We are glad to know it will be an easier obstacle to overcome for AG Abbott. We’re confident that in Abbott’s run for governor, he’ll be able to make the case that conservative values, that have been so cherished in the Latino Community, have also been instrumental in helping Texas remain a magnet for people fleeing less successful left-wing dominated states and their progressive polices.

Abbott on Sunday announced that he is running for governor of the state, and is currently the odds-on favorite to win next year’s Republican nomination and thus the election. Battleground Texas tried exposing a potential weakness for Abbott with the Latino community Wednesday, by tweeting at him in Spanish.

abbott-pwnage

Battleground Texas’ hit flopped embarrassingly, as Abbott responded in Spanish that his wife is a Latina, and that he can speak to all of Texas communities for himself. According to her official biography posted on Abbott’s campaign website, Cecilia Abbott is the “granddaughter of immigrants from Mexico,” and “was raised in San Antonio by parents who were both educators.”

There go two of the left’s cherished talking points against Republicans: Race and education. Cecilia Abbott holds three university degrees, in psychology, education and theology.

Battleground Texas has not explained why it assumed that one must speak in Spanish in order to connect to Texas Latinos. As newcomers to the state President Obama’s campaigners may not be aware that Texas was once a part of Mexico, and Latinos and Latino culture have been part of the fabric of the state for centuries. They are welcome to brush up on their Texas history while they are here. It’s usually taught in the seventh grade.