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The PJ Tatler

by
Dan Miller

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June 1, 2011 - 1:23 pm

Or maybe it’s all a conspiracy.

According to a global happiness index allegedly from North Korea,

the country and its allies are the most cheerful countries in the world. . . .

Shanghaiist reports that North Korea’s Chosun Central Television recently came out with a happiness index compiled by local researchers. Their findings? China is the happiest place on the planet, earning 100 points (a perfect score!). At number two is none other than North Korea itself. Cuba, Iran and Venezuela (in that order) round out the top five.

. . . .

The United States places dead last, coming in 203rd. South Korea is nearly just as depressed a nation; it ranks 152nd on the list.

Based on extensive research, presumably including the review of numerous tweets from and interviews with Rep. Anthony Weiner (D. N.Y.), information from and about former presidential aspirant John Edwards as well as news of U.S. backed genocidal atrocities in Palestine, these findings should not be questioned. As an humanitarian gesture, North Korea should publish them widely in Latin America to stem the migration of already pitiful victims of those countries’ poverty. Otherwise, their sad plights will worsen dramatically upon arrival in the United States, the unhappiest of countries. North Korea should also send Happy Meals and other aid immediately.

The U.S. special envoy for North Korean human rights visited Pyongyang last week, ostensibly to consult on how food aid should be distributed to North Korea’s extremely happy people, who plainly do not need it.  It has not yet been acknowledged that he instead sought North Korean happiness assistance for the United States. However, the State Department has denied neither that he made such a request nor that such assistance would be welcomed. Might this stonewalling be evidence of a conspiracy to suppress domestic news of North Korea’s findings? Alternatively, the report about those findings may itself be a hoax, concocted by the Department of Immigration and Naturalization to reduce the excessive demands on its own overburdened staff. We may never learn the answers to these important questions;  as those questions remain unanswered the conspiracy suspicions they raise will continue to fester.

Dan Miller graduated from Yale University in 1963 and from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1966. He retired from the practice of law in Washington, D.C., in 1996 and has lived in a rural area in Panama since 2002.
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