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Roger L. Simon

‘Voter Fraud Watch’ — Uncle Pajamas Wants You!

October 10th, 2010 - 8:14 pm

OUR ELECTION DAY PLAN

PJMedia is announcing a new initiative for election day 2010 — “VOTER FRAUD WATCH.”   This initiative is to be carried forth on PJ Media and PJTV.

As almost everyone would agree, in a democracy the integrity of the vote is paramount.  If significant fraud or intimidation occurs at our polling places during an election, our democratic system of government is in peril.

PJMedia has been at the forefront of this struggle for integrity of the vote, most recently via its coverage of the Department of Justice/New Black Panther  controversy. This coverage was led by DOJ whistle blower and former attorney in the department’s voter rights division, J. Christian Adams.  Mr. Adams has agreed to lend his legal expertise to “Voter Fraud Watch.”

WHAT WE INTEND TO DO

Under “Voter Fraud Watch” PJMedia seeks to develop a network of citizen journalists/poll watchers to monitor as many polling places as possible across the nation on election day.  These people would report back to us — with either video, still photos, text or some combination thereof — on cases of voter fraud, intimidation or other voting malfeasances they may encounter. We will then cover these occurrences heavily on PJ Media and PJTV and promote them to the media at large.

It should go without saying that we expect these reports to be made irrespective of the political party or ideology of the person or persons involved.

WHAT POLL WATCHERS SHOULD LOOK FOR

Most important are voter intimidation and “electioneering within X feet of the poll.”  (The X is there because this distance is matter of state law. Please check the requirements in your state.) These areas are obvious and visible.

According to Christian Adams, other areas of interest are:

1. Forced assistance.  Everyone has a right to have someone help them vote, except their employer or union representative.  But all too often forced assistance is imposed on elderly voters. The voter doesn’t get to vote, but instead the assistor votes for them.  This allows large numbers of votes to be cast by a single machine connected assistor.  This particularly corrupts the “down ballot” contests where the voters would otherwise have no idea for whom to vote.

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