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Belmont Club

For Auld Lang Syne

February 11th, 2014 - 2:41 am

Shirley Temple has died. She was 85. “We salute her for a life of remarkable achievements as an actor, as a diplomat, and… our beloved mother, grandmother [and] great-grandmother.”

From Wikipedia:

Following her venture into television, Temple became active in the Republican Party in California. In 1967, she ran unsuccessfully in a special election in California’s 11th congressional district to fill the seat left vacant by the death of eight-term Republican J. Arthur Younger from leukemia. She ran as a conservative and lost to law school professor Pete McCloskey, a liberal Republican who was a staunch opponent of the Vietnam War.

She was appointed Representative to the 24th United Nations General Assembly by President Richard M. Nixon (September – December 1969), and was appointed United States Ambassador to Ghana (December 6, 1974 – July 13, 1976) by President Gerald R. Ford. She was appointed first female Chief of Protocol of the United States (July 1, 1976 – January 21, 1977), and was in charge of arrangements for President Jimmy Carter’s inauguration and inaugural ball. She served as the United States Ambassador to Czechoslovakia (August 23, 1989 – July 12, 1992), having been appointed by President George H. W. Bush.


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Top Rated Comments   
She was asked about this many times. She never answered the question directly but always gave the impression that she left the entertainment business because ... she grew up. It was kid's stuff to her: fun while it lasted, but when the time came to move on--to put away childish things--she did. This speaks very well for her, I think; and in every sense. She grew up, became an adult, lived an adult's life. God bless her for that.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
My childhood memories of Shirley Temple include not only watching her films on my parents' 1950s black-and-white television set, but also the nonalcoholic drink that was named after her. My dad used to fix "Shirley Temples" for me and my cousins so "the kids" wouldn't feel left out at family holiday parties. His version of the drink was ginger ale or 7-Up over ice, with maraschino cherry juice added for color, an orange slice on the rim of the glass, and a cherry on top of the whole concoction. It was a nice touch of class for kids-- just like Shirley herself. Of course that was back in the days when kids still wanted to grow into mature adults, rather than adults wanting to act like overgrown kids.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (11)
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In Poor Little Rich Girl with her co-stars Alice Faye and Jack Haley, she was the only one who could do that final, complicated, military tap dance right off. She was flawless. In the middle of the Depression she was the #1 most popular movie star for several years. She deserved every tribute and accolade.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Incidentally, "Wee Willie Winkie" is a terrific movie about the Anglo-Afghan wars in the late 19th century. With an idealized ending, to be sure--if only real life were that way. That scene shown above where Priscilla sings "Auld Lang Syne" to McDuff (Victor McLaglen) as he lays dying of battle wounds is one for the books. If a you're a manly guy and it didn't bring a tear to your eye when you first saw it, then I bet you never got teary-eyed when you watched Old Yellar or the Yearling die. If that's the case, you are very probably a sociopath.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Everything Shirley Temple did she did professionally. By that I mean with thought and planning, respect for the customer and focused attention, and joy in the ability to work.

Jimmy Carter's inauguration went off without a hitch. After that it was all downhill.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
We all forget, and most never knew, that she grew into a gorgeous young woman. Not sure why she didn't make a successful transition to adult acting, but she should have been very good at it.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment

I've always had the impression that she simply didn't care to try that hard. Dancing with Mr. Bojangles, under his metaphorical wing, was fun. Perhaps once she was old enough to see the sharks' teeth, she declined to participate further.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
She was asked about this many times. She never answered the question directly but always gave the impression that she left the entertainment business because ... she grew up. It was kid's stuff to her: fun while it lasted, but when the time came to move on--to put away childish things--she did. This speaks very well for her, I think; and in every sense. She grew up, became an adult, lived an adult's life. God bless her for that.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
My childhood memories of Shirley Temple include not only watching her films on my parents' 1950s black-and-white television set, but also the nonalcoholic drink that was named after her. My dad used to fix "Shirley Temples" for me and my cousins so "the kids" wouldn't feel left out at family holiday parties. His version of the drink was ginger ale or 7-Up over ice, with maraschino cherry juice added for color, an orange slice on the rim of the glass, and a cherry on top of the whole concoction. It was a nice touch of class for kids-- just like Shirley herself. Of course that was back in the days when kids still wanted to grow into mature adults, rather than adults wanting to act like overgrown kids.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Of course that was back in the days..."

On our regular home-cooked steak nights, the wife and I have a cocktail and appetizers before the roasting begins. In the interest of modeling moderate drinking behavior, I get down some fancy glasses for the kids and mix sodas with their choice of syrups. And a cherry, of course.

Ms. Temple's contribution to culinary culture seems pretty secure to me.

"But the good old days weren't always good, and tomorrow ain't as bad as it seems."
-Billy Joel, "Keeping the Faith"
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Greatest child actress ever. Her dance scenes with Bill Robinson are extraordinary. She looked like she was having great fun--and it turns out that this was indeed the case. What a cutie-pie. What a talent. A true natural.

The "Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer" is (very) arguably her best movie and one of the funniest movies of all time. Her interplay with Cary Grant and Myrna Loy is matchless, hilarious. They don't make 'em like that anymore.

And they don't make 'em like Shirley Temple anymore either. She very sensibly left the entertainment industry to pursue a diplomatic career. Served her country well and honorably for her entire adult life.

God be with you. She's in heaven now, "ever so happy" to be there. I'm sure she's dancing up a storm with Bill Robinson again, to God's great enjoyment.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
I just saw her in Fort Apache as a young adult with Henry Ford and John Wayne. She was lovely.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
I never had the pleasure of meeting Shirley in person, but I did speak to her on the telephone several times as I was working with her husband, Charlie, on several overseas fisheries development projects. She always struck me as a very classy, elegant, but yet, down-to-earth and playful woman.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
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