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Anger Is An Agent For Change. So Why Control It?

Fueling creativity with Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way. Let's try this again.

by
Rhonda Robinson

Bio

April 21, 2014 - 1:00 pm
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NoEyesNellie

Penelope, my constant companion.

Do you ever wake up feeling guilty or angry with yourself? Contrary to popular belief, anger and guilt aren’t about self-control– they’re catalysts for change.

One of the perks of old age is that I seldom do things that make me feel guilty. The majority of my guilt comes from things I don’t do.

There’s a lot to be said about our conscious. In “Is Self-Esteem a Social Construct or the Soul’s Self-Awarness“ I wrote about how our “self” is stamped with the knowledge of right and wrong, and how it comes with a moral imprint. While this is true, all guilt doesn’t necessarily come from immorality. Nor is all anger wrong.

I’ve battled bouts of guilt all week. Like, every time I look at my dog. Poor girl can’t see me because I’ve failed to take the time to cut holes out of her mop for her eyes. I’ve been guilty of not calling my mother–and getting lost in Facebook when I should be working, just to name a few. All of these things seem minor on the surface. But they do in fact diminish the quality of my life, and those I love–in small and large ways.

Recently, I woke up under a severe reality attack–another failure, I’d been too busy to realize. I failed to continue both my series. The works on Ernest Becker that I began here, and creative recovery which began as a promise to my daughter. While I consider both important for several reasons, guess which one held enough guilt to induce anger at myself?

I made commitments on two levels. First to my daughter who once begged, “Come draw with me mama.” The idea of this creative series was to explore and revitalize our creative lives as artists, and bring our PJ readers along for the ride. Our thirteen-week adventure The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron fizzled out in just four weeks.

My theory is that when we fail to do something that we know is right or would enrich our lives and relationships–it’s more of a spiritual battle than one of self-discipline.

When confronted with failure of any sort Michael Hyatt explains we have three options: recommit, revise or remove.

I chose to recommit. That’s when I learned about anger.

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All Comments   (3)
All Comments   (3)
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This is some of your very best writing, strong and powerful. It makes me want to take action with my own creative works.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Thank you so much Katherine, that really means a lot.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why control it? Because "change" has no intrinsic value. Most of the ways I could change things would have utterly disastrous consequences. Some precious few would be improvements. Anger usually points directly to one of the bad options. At best anger can be a signal that something needs attention, but God help you if you listen to it further. In the end that anger signal is probably just telling you something you should have known already.

I recommend Seneca's writings on the subject.
31 weeks ago
31 weeks ago Link To Comment
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