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by
Allen Mitchum

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April 10, 2014 - 8:17 am
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netflix_television

Comparing watching television to reading a book sounds ridiculous. Especially to those of us raised in a world where TV watchers are derided as couch potatoes and reading is deemed an enlightened activity. So I’m prepared for bibliophiles and even casual readers will take issue with the title of this post. But technology advancements and the improved sophistication and structure in television programming has turned watching TV into an experience very similar to reading a novel.

As an avid reader and author, it took me a while to fully appreciate this new phenomenon, though I’ve fully embraced it now as a regular video content consumer (see, Justified and Breaking Bad). In other words, I have, finally given into binge watching – the practice of consuming numerous episodes of a TV show in a short period of time. An activity that was once ridiculed, binge watching is now a social norm.

There are four primary factors for the rapid change in the consumption and format of TV programming that led to it resembling a live action novel. Each occurred independently, but combined, created the conditions necessary to set in motion the evolution:

(1) high speed internet made the distribution of large video files relatively easy;

(2) services like Netflix secured licensing deals for TV programs and then efficiently and conveniently allowed users to access the content on their schedule, for their chosen duration and at their preferred location;

(3) an increase in the sophistication of TV programs, which has created a “golden age of television” that is supplanting film as the preferred visual entertainment for adults; and

(4) TV shows transitioning to a chapter format more similar to a novel where individual shows need to be watched in order

These factors have combined to make watching TV an experience increasingly similar to reading a novel. TV viewers no longer need to wait weeks or months to watch the next installment of their favorite program. They can continue onto the next episode (i.e. a chapter) at their leisure and convenience. “Binge reading” is a luxury that readers have enjoyed for centuries. Technology now enables TV viewers to do the same.

Taking this transition to the next level was the switch to a chapter format for TV programming, which is almost the norm in today’s most acclaimed dramas and even some comedies. Consider the contrast with Law & Order, or one of my favorite shows, Magnum PI. Those types of shows were designed for episodes to be watched in isolation and out of order without affecting the viewers experience. Each installment is effectively a short story. That’s not the case with much of today’s programming, which are structured like novels, with each episode in a season equivalent to an individual chapter. You can’t watch Breaking Bad or Game of Thrones out of order. Even the Sopranos would be difficult as each season has a running theme that infiltrates each episode. Just as picking up a copy of The Firm and reading random chapters wouldn’t make sense, the same applies to shows like Breaking Bad.

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All Comments   (8)
All Comments   (8)
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Anything by Louis L'Amour.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
Man-Kzinti Wars
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
I will say netflix has enabled me to watch far more documentaries and foreign films than I ever could before.
The $ cost of trying a film is 0 and if it is bad or leftist I move on. Recently watched everything on the Rape of Nanking that is on netflix.

Different perspectives told a rather complete story.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
For a mini series, I'd like to see The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
The older readers may remember the old serial movies like Flash Gordon, these were also to be viewed in the proper order.
The only difference was that you had to buy a movie theater ticket to see them.
22 weeks ago
22 weeks ago Link To Comment
I think Slide Rule, the Nevil Shute autobiography that focuses especially on the British airship program of the 1920s, could be turned into a fantastic series.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
My issue with your title is that you give credit to Netflix for making binge-watching possible. That's simply not true.

I've never had Netflix or even seen Netflix. I've been binge-watching for years. It started with The Wire. I bought the first season on DVD a couple of years after it had run on HBO. I'd watch a single episode and find myself so eager to see what happened next that I'd simply watch the next episode immediately. And that was so good that I figured I might as well watch the last episode on the disk - most disks had only three episodes on them - too. All in one sitting.

I'd never done that before, having been conditioned to watching one episode, then waiting as patiently as I could for the next episode. I found it suited me, perhaps because I was always an avid book reader as a kid.

Now, binge-watching is my preferred approach for my favorite shows, like Breaking Bad, The Wire, and so forth.

Of course I still watch shows in the more traditional way too. The weaker shows get watched as they appear, an episode at a time. That tides me over until I have a new season of one of the great shows.

23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Babylon 5 did a five year arc, each year of the show being a year in the B-5 Universe. It would be appropriate to view each episode as a book chapter, each season as a volume as part of a five-volume set.

Pity that due to seasonal renewal uncertainty, the show wound up as a four-year-plus-one. I hope J. Michael Straczynski considers his future options under Netflix.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
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