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Paul, George, Ringo & the Prophet John

How The Beatles led Soviet teens to political and spiritual freedom.

by
Susan L.M. Goldberg

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February 4, 2014 - 8:00 am
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The Beatles Generation in the #USSR #socialism #music #beatles

As the world mourned the loss of Soviet evangelist Pete Seeger last week, I encountered stories of real Soviets who found God, not in the hammer and sickle of the USSR, but in the smuggled bootleg lyrics of the Beatles.

How the Beatles Rocked the Kremlin is a fascinating narrative detailing Soviet Baby Boomers’ covert love affair with the Fab Four. Interviewing a variety of Russian Beatlemaniacs, including many post-Communist music scene movers and shakers, over the course of nearly two decades, British filmmaker Leslie Woodhead discovered that The Beatles were much more than a band in the U.S.S.R. For many Soviet teens, The Beatles were a glimpse at independence, freedom, and even God.

The idea that a rock and roll band could provoke the understanding of the intertwining of God and freedom, let alone inspire a search for the divine, is one that is largely lost on an American audience. After all, as Soviet teens risked Kremlin hellfire to listen to Beatles tracks, their American counterparts in the Bible Belt were throwing their records on bonfires, forced by a religious hierarchy that saw John Lennon and his band as a threat to Christ. Rock music then became the stuff of hippies, the class that scoffed at religious institutions and, like The Beatles, sought divine encounters and self-empowerment through eastern religions.

Arguably, the advocates of Beatles burnings did more to harm Christ’s reputation and following than John Lennon ever could. After all, as he explained, his ironic quip about Jesus was more of a warning than a declaration:

“I’m not anti-God, anti-Christ or anti-religion. I was not saying we are greater or better. I believe in God, but not as one thing, not as an old man in the sky. I’m sorry I said it, really. I never meant it to be a lousy anti-religious thing. From what I’ve read, or observed, Christianity just seems to be shrinking, to be losing contact.”

Ironically, it’s a warning that post-Soviet leaders like Vladimir Putin have heeded with their own political purposes in mind.

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"The idea that a rock and roll band could provoke the understanding of the intertwining of God and freedom, let alone inspire a search for the divine, is one that is largely lost on an American audience. "

But.... they didn't. They promoted the slavery of Marxism, no matter what "feelings" anyone tried to read into their music.

29 weeks ago
29 weeks ago Link To Comment
So *that's* why The Beatles were banned in the USSR...tricky, tricky! Taxman is really commentary on the beauty of paying 99% of your income to the state... I guess Harrison didn't get the memo. And "if you go carrying pictures of Chairman Mao, you ain't gonna make it with anyone anyhow" was just code, I'm sure.
29 weeks ago
29 weeks ago Link To Comment
If you haven't read Marx (and it's apparent you have not), it's time.

29 weeks ago
29 weeks ago Link To Comment
I read somewhere recently that the CIA supported and funded modern art. Maybe the idea was to redirect artists away from Communism. Or maybe it was to make art a 'weapon.' It would seem that rock and roll served the same purpose.
29 weeks ago
29 weeks ago Link To Comment
Steve, you really ought to read Marx and the Humanist Manifestos.

Modern "art", like modern "music" and the dumbing down of education, is the heart and soul of Marx's efforts to bring down free societies by destroying them from within.

A CIA plot? Not even close.

29 weeks ago
29 weeks ago Link To Comment
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