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Jews and the People Who Love Them

Why doesn’t everyone feel “a little Jewish”?

by
Janice Fiamengo

Bio

October 27, 2013 - 12:00 pm
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Daniel Silva’s latest spy thriller about Mossad agent Gabriel Allon, The English Girl, involves a character named Christopher Keller, an assassin who had once tried to kill Allon but has now agreed to help him with a kidnapping case. Keller is by birth a Brit who faked his own death to begin a new life as a hired gun on the island of Corsica. While he and Allon wait for a target to appear, he tells the Israeli agent that he has “always felt a little Jewish […] in a spiritual sense.” By the novel’s end, he is considering becoming Israeli to work for Israel’s Secret Service, reminding Gabriel that he still feels “a little Jewish.”

In a world in which anti-Semitism is on a marked upswing yet again—Keller’s native Britain was declared by Caroline Glick to be unlivable for Jews, and David Hornik reports that increasing Jew hatred in many countries of Europe, particularly France, Belgium, and Hungary, has led to significant Jewish emigration—such a character’s emotional affiliation for Jewishness and the Jewish state might seem merely wishful thinking on Silva’s part. If more people felt like Keller, Allon would not need to be so vigilant in his country’s defense: a BBC global survey found  that a large percentage of respondents ranked Israel in the same group as Iran and North Korea—this despite a democratic culture and admirable human rights record that should, by any reasonable measure, cause it to be widely respected on the world scene.

So why doesn’t everyone feel “a little Jewish”? Why indeed. As David Hornik points out in a recent article for PJ Media, part of his excellent “Israel, Leper or Light unto the Nations” series, Zionists of the early twentieth century believed that the lack of a homeland made Jews particularly vulnerable to pathological hatred and that the creation of the state of Israel would not only provide a safe haven but would also moderate anti-Semitism by normalizing Jewish national identity. With the creation of Israel, the Zionists reasoned, Jews would no longer be regarded as stateless pariahs but would be respected as citizens of their own country.

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Top Rated Comments   
More evidence for the assertion that American Christianity is not our great-grandparents' European version; something has truly changed down at the roots, and it's a welcome and beautiful thing!
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (18)
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Jews are blessed to live in the U.S.

"For happily the Government of the United States ... gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance ... May the Children of the Stock of Abraham ... continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other Inhabitants ... and there shall be none to make him afraid ... May the father of all mercies scatter light and not darkness in our paths ...”

-- President George Washington, Letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, 1790

Jews we not allowed to hold political office at that time, but perhaps Washington remembered back to 1781 when the British were cornered in Yorktown, VA, and he needed to move his men from upstate NY to deliver the finishing blow. But Washington's Superintendent of Finance, Robert Morris, gave him some dire news: there were no funds with which to feed, arm, transport, and pay the men.

Washington gave Morris a simple but eloquent order: "Send for Haym Solomon". Solomon raised the money, and Washington conducted the Yorktown campaign, which proved to be the final battle of the Revolution. Morris later worked to pass legislation allowing Jews to vote.

Compare that to Jews living in Europe. Most of us know about the Nazis (especially the American GIs who liberated the camps), so let's go back a bit farther to another example in 1348, when the rumor spread that the bubonic plague was caused by Jews to poison Christendom, a well worn theme.

The Pope tried to reason with the mobs, by pointing out that the Jews were also dying from the plague. But the scapegoaters had a torture-extracted confession from a Jew saying he had poisoned the water supply. As a result, thousands of Jews were killed, entire Jewish communities were wiped out, and their property confiscated. Of course, today we know that bubonic plague is transmitted by flea bites and inhalation, so the torture-extracted confession couldn't have been true, because the plague isn't passed by water.

But there is still work to done, even in the US: FBI Hate Crime Statistics, 2011, Table 4, religious based hate crimes:

Anti-Jewish 62%
Anti-Christian 9%
Anti-Islamic 13%
24 weeks ago
24 weeks ago Link To Comment
We don't feel "Jewish" because:

1. We are not; and.
2. Some of us (shock) don't consider Jewish behavior as something worth adulating.

This website is the lamest ever. Pandering seems to an American hobby.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
Greetings:

Many, many years ago, I saw a movie called "Tobruk" in which Rock Hudson starred as, i guess, a British army officer and George Peppard starred as a then Palestinian Jew in some kind of a commando unit fighting with the British. One bit of dialogue stuck with me over the years. Hudson says to Peppard, "There's a little bit of the Jew in all of us." to which Peppard relies, "And a little bit of the Nazi, too."

I grew up in the Bronx of the '50s and '60s. In our small by New York standards neighborhood, the two largest demographics were those of Jewish heritage and those of (my own) Irish heritage. Those experiences left me somewhat confused when people talk about "the Jews". In our neighborhood there were all kinds of Jews European, shephardic, 2nd or 3rd generation Americans, ones with numbers tattooed on their arms and ones who fought WW II. There were business owners, union members, cab drivers, cops and even a smattering of "ginksters". So, I was fortunate that, in growing up, I never really assigned very much value to the "Jew" label any more than I did to the "Irish Catholic" label.

That being said, I find it sad to see American Jewry so confused and divided in these dangerous days.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
(¯`•.•´¯) (¯`•.•´¯)
*`•.¸(¯`•. •´¯)¸.•´
¤ º° ¤`•.¸.•´¤
>>>> http://x.co/2hNL1 <<<<<<◘◘ ◘◘ ◘◘
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't know that I "love" them, but I certainly admire the Jews. All one has to do is compare their Nobel science awards with Muslims and you get the picture.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
I sometimes wish Israel had never been re-created. Many of the Jews who immigrated there would have come to America instead.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
On the contrary, I'm beginning to think that the Jews who chose to avoid American politics were making the right decision...
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
Being raised in one of the evangelical faiths (Southern Baptist), I was always taught that one could not be a true Christian without being a friend of Abraham, as well as other pro-Israel/Jewish teachings. So, I have never understood this anti-Semitic attitude, especially of people and nations that are predominately Christian. But yet, the attitude exists............
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
I like Jews and Indians. they want to get ahead, work hard. they are the ideal Americans.
may many more emigrate here.
Spanish speakers, not so much.
not Jewish enough.
and except for the bacon, my breakfast is kosher.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
Your last sentence was very good, an almost. The truth is there is only one war, it is between good and evil, and while for a time the Jewish nation is set aside until the gentile nations have all had their time at the alter, their promises are from a God Who does not change. As such they will be a target for evil until the end.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Why doesn’t everyone feel “a little Jewish?"

What a STUPID question to ask. Whether you study the Tanakh or the King James, you should learn that Judah was only one of the twelve tribes of Israel. To say that all of Israel are "Jews" is the same as saying that all Americans are Texans, Floridians, New Yorkers etc.
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
I would personally volunteer to watch over Bar Refaeli...for free!

Remember BENGHAZI!
25 weeks ago
25 weeks ago Link To Comment
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