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A Conference on Fatherhood and Men

Free admission and open to all men ages 13 and up.

by
Andrew Klavan

Bio

June 7, 2013 - 12:00 pm

How can men speak honestly about relationships and fatherhood? Easy — don’t include women in the conversation. That way, laughable irrelevancies like fairness, equality, communication, and sharing housework can be left behind and you can get down to discussing what really matters and what really works.

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That’s why I’ll be participating in a panel at “BOND’s Annual Conference on Fatherhood and Men,” which is open to all men 13 and older. BOND — “Rebuilding the family by rebuilding the man.” — is the organization run by the courageous preacher and frequent “Hannity” guest Jesse Lee Peterson. I once wrote of him in a City Journal profile:

Peterson decries the transformation of the civil rights movement from a principled appeal to the American creed to a politicized shakedown of guilt-ridden whites. He condemns the government subsidies of single motherhood that have helped set loose a plague of black illegitimacy and its attendant plagues of generational poverty and crime. And he bemoans the black culture of dependency on government support that even welfare workers privately call “welfare psychosis.”

But Peterson is no metropolitan academic. Despite his quiet demeanor and delivery, his message is charged with that old-time religion. Where [Shelby] Steele views the last 40 years of civil rights activism as a complex and poisonous blend of white guilt, black opportunism, and government incompetence and corruption, Peterson sees an intentional power grab by an anti-American Left, a self-interested attempt to destroy the nation by destroying manhood and marriage, part of the ongoing and eternal struggle between the forces of Good and Evil. “You cannot control a moral people,” he tells me. “You have to keep them immoral in order to control them.”

Hit the poster for more information on the conference. And look here for the rest of my profile of this brave and important man.

****

Cross-posted from Klavan on the Culture

Andrew Klavan’s newest novel is Nightmare City.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
Greetings:

if you will permit my favorite reminisce on your subject...

I grew up in the Bronx of the last '50s and '60s but was fortunate to be in a family that had a summer bungalow about 60 miles north in Putnam County. Thus, I had the benefit of both an urban culture and a country culture.



Spending summers upstate, my friends were country boys, used to going into the woods, camping overnight, and having our days to ourselves with no threat of nearby adult supervision. 
Before long, I wanted to acquire the local accoutrements, guns and knives being my highest priorities.

My city-girl mother wasn't having any of it; my father, born in southwest Ireland and a WWII graduate, quickly became my only chance for successful acquisitions. Initially, I separated him from his "war-knife" and subsequently began working on him for a 22 caliber rifle.

 When my mother found out that my father was having me join a gun club in preparation for my new tool, he and my mother had an intense dinner time discussion about the appropriateness of a relative youngster having his own firearm.

My mother insisted that this was no way to raise a child. My father's conclusionary statement was "I'm not raising a child; I'm raising a man."
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (21)
All Comments   (21)
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Sounds terrific, I'll echo what others have said. Fathers are important to sons and daughters.

My father was the most important influence in my life. He was the head of our family, my mother would not have married any other "type". He and I battled for decades, over little things, never big things. When I got cancer the first time, it all changed. Never any battles, he treated me like a friend. We had deep and meaningful conversations, facing death clarifies much.

I am so proud to be like him. My nephew also has his "Grampy's" personality and the two of us feel so special. Fathers inspire, teach and protect. They give us a sense of the world. Everything would be different without mine.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I am going to this, suspect it will be a typical LA croc, but hoping it may have some merit, it is free and I'm unemployed, and they have free lunch and refreshments.

The man and his son on the advertisement are black, I doubt there will be any black men attending.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'd be willing to place a bet that most of the women who post here - conservative, thoughtful women - had fathers who respected and inspired them. I had a mother who possessed all the evil qualities of the stereotypical "bad mother" and growing up with her was pure hell, but I had a wonderful, kind, intelligent father who was a true gentleman and who was my major influence. Fathers are just as important to girls as they are to boys.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
the best statement yet on how to raise a "MAN" is to ban women from attending!
OUTSTANDING AND TRUTHFUL COMMENT!!!!!
Once all the femmi-nazis wipe the froth from their mouths and take a breath, you can "put the shoe on the other foot" and ask them how they would feel about a conference on motherhood and how to raise a girl into a good woman?

I bet the vote would be 100% keep the men out! and everyone would be fine with it just like that.

Don't even get me started on two gay men that decide to have a "boy" and try to teach him how to be a "man"!

ditto for lezbots teaching a young girl how to be a good woman!!!!!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I wonder how many blacks will attend?
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Raised 4 fine kids with equally fine grandkids. But I went to school when God and right and wrong are there. Mad sure my kids got the message also - tho mostly w/o the schools help.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Quick. Someone google "Alpha men".
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I don't see how marriage can survive when it has morphed into a system where a man supports a family until he is no longer wanted. at that point he goes before a feminist trained judge who takes everything he loves away from him, assigns him a heavy future price to pay (possibly forever), and gives complete control to the children he loves more than life itself, to a woman who likes and respects him less each day. its a recipe for failure, cooked up by feminists.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I agree, but some men still want to get married and have children. Therefore, we should applaud their efforts to do it well.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Only in societies where fatherhood is debased, and children are slaughtered in the womb have conferences on Men and Fatherhood.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I did not need a conference like this to learn how to be a man. I was lucky. I had a dad who taught me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
You ARE lucky: I had a dad who DIDN'T teach me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Greetings:

if you will permit my favorite reminisce on your subject...

I grew up in the Bronx of the last '50s and '60s but was fortunate to be in a family that had a summer bungalow about 60 miles north in Putnam County. Thus, I had the benefit of both an urban culture and a country culture.



Spending summers upstate, my friends were country boys, used to going into the woods, camping overnight, and having our days to ourselves with no threat of nearby adult supervision. 
Before long, I wanted to acquire the local accoutrements, guns and knives being my highest priorities.

My city-girl mother wasn't having any of it; my father, born in southwest Ireland and a WWII graduate, quickly became my only chance for successful acquisitions. Initially, I separated him from his "war-knife" and subsequently began working on him for a 22 caliber rifle.

 When my mother found out that my father was having me join a gun club in preparation for my new tool, he and my mother had an intense dinner time discussion about the appropriateness of a relative youngster having his own firearm.

My mother insisted that this was no way to raise a child. My father's conclusionary statement was "I'm not raising a child; I'm raising a man."
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
That was a marvelous way for your father to conclude the discussion.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I sure wont forget it.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
i like your father
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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