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‘A Writer Who Waits for Ideal Conditions Under Which to Work Will Die Without Putting a Word on Paper.’ – E.B. White

Brain Pickings collects the writing regiments of such famous writers as Ray Bradbury, Ernest Hemingway, and Benjamin Franklin.

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November 29, 2012 - 12:00 pm

via The Daily Routines of Famous Writers | Brain Pickings.

Ray Bradbury, a lifelong proponent of working with joy and an avid champion of public libraries, playfully defies the question of routines in this 2010 interview:

My passions drive me to the typewriter every day of my life, and they have driven me there since I was twelve. So I never have to worry about schedules. Some new thing is always exploding in me, and it schedules me, I don’t schedule it. It says: Get to the typewriter right now and finish this.

[…]

I can work anywhere. I wrote in bedrooms and living rooms when I was growing up with my parents and my brother in a small house in Los Angeles. I worked on my typewriter in the living room, with the radio and my mother and dad and brother all talking at the same time. Later on, when I wanted to write Fahrenheit 451, I went up to UCLA and found a basement typing room where, if you inserted ten cents into the typewriter, you could buy thirty minutes of typing time.

[....]

Ernest Hemingway, who famously wrote standing (“Hemingway stands when he writes. He stands in a pair of his oversized loafers on the worn skin of a lesser kudu—the typewriter and the reading board chest-high opposite him.”), approaches his craft with equal parts poeticism and pragmatism:

When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again. You have started at six in the morning, say, and may go on until noon or be through before that. When you stop you are as empty, and at the same time never empty but filling, as when you have made love to someone you love. Nothing can hurt you, nothing can happen, nothing means anything until the next day when you do it again. It is the wait until the next day that is hard to get through.

[....]

Productivity maniac Benjamin Franklin had a formidably rigorous daily routine:

Read the whole thing

Hat tip: AB

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Related at PJ Lifestyle on writing:

‘They’re Responding to What I Wrote, Not Me.’

An Old Fashioned Secret For Injecting Some Life Back Into Your Writing

Talent Isn’t Everything: 5 Secrets to Freelance Success

10 Reasons You Should Skip Traditional Publishers and Self-Publish Ebooks Instead

A collection of links, videos, and excerpts on writing.
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