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Ed Driscoll

When the story of Muzzammil Hassan, the Buffalo TV executive who was accused of beheading his wife first broke in February of 2009, the headline at Hot Air summed it all up in quick, if appropriately grisly fashion: “Man who started TV network to improve Muslims’ image beheads wife.”

Naturally, the legacy media ran as far a way as possible from the potential root causes of the story. Paraphrasing a legendary New York Post headline from almost 30 years ago, Mark Steyn described the MSM’s feckless response as “Headless body in gutless press.”

Two years later, Hassan has been found guilty, the BBC reports:

A New York television executive has been convicted of stabbing his wife to death and beheading her.

A jury found Pakistan-born Muzzammil Hassan guilty of second-degree murder in the 2009 death of Aasiya Hassan six days after she filed for divorce.

Hassan never denied killing her but said she had abused him and that he had acted in self-defence. He served as his own lawyer during the three-week trial.

Hassan, who founded a Muslim-oriented TV network, could face life in prison.

He claims to have beheaded his wife in self-defense? How does that work exactly? I’d love to have heard the “logic” employed to reach that conclusion.

Update: Mark Steyn on “Head Case,” where Mark writes, “The Hassan case was fascinating not just because his entire public identity was a fraud but because the media so enthusiastically promoted that fraud.”

And at Newsreal, Pajamas alumnus Phylis Chesler goes “Inside the Mind of an Islamist: 5 Keys to the Psychology of an Honor Killer.”

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