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A Mother's Public Shaming of Her Sons Shows Feminism's Toxicity

Last year, writer Jody Allard figured she could throw her own sons under the bus of "rape culture" and be treated approvingly. After all, they're only men. What does it matter if she compares them to rapists?

Since then, one of Allard's sons is, according to her, rebelling against her horrific feminist parenting by embracing the political right.

So of course, she does it again -- with a GHASTLY article titled "I’m Done Pretending Men Are Safe (Even My Sons)."

Let's hope Child Protective Services is paying attention:

I wrote an essay in  The Washington Post last year, during the height of the Brock Turner case, about  my sons and rape culture. I didn’t think it would be controversial when I wrote it; I was sure most parents grappled with raising sons in the midst of rape culture. The struggle I wrote about was universal, I thought, but I was wrong. My essay went semi-viral, and for the first time my sons encountered my words about them on their friends’ phones, their teachers’ computers, and even overheard them discussed by strangers on a crowded metro bus. It was one thing to agree to be written about in relative obscurity, and quite another thing to have my words intrude on their daily lives.

One of my sons was hurt by my words, although he’s never told me so. He doesn’t understand why I lumped him and his brother together in my essay. He sees himself as the “good” one, the one who is sensitive and thoughtful, and who listens instead of reacts. He doesn’t understand that even quiet misogyny is misogyny, and that not all sexists sound like Twitter trolls. He is angry at me now, although he won’t admit that either, and his anger led him to conservative websites and YouTube channels; places where he can surround himself with righteous indignation against feminists, and tell himself it’s ungrateful women like me who are the problem.

I teeter frequently between supporting my son and educating him. Is it my job as his mother to ensure he feels safe emotionally, no matter what violence he spews? Is it my job as his mother to steer and educate, no matter how much that education challenges his view of himself? I think it’s both, but the balance between the two has proven impossible to pinpoint. When I hear his voice become defensive, I back off but question whether I’m doing him any favors by allowing his perception of himself to go unchallenged. When I confront him with his own sexism, I question whether I’m pushing too hard and leaving him without an emotional safe space in his home.

Today's feminism isn't just wrong-headed, it's toxic. Listen to this Nazi thought from Allard: