October 17, 2015

IN AMERICA, THE YOUNG ARE ALWAYS READY TO GIVE TO THOSE WHO ARE OLDER THAN THEMSELVES THE FULL BENEFITS OF THEIR INEXPERIENCE: A Note to Entitled Millennials in the Workplace: Give Humility a Try.

And most millennials new to the workplace have much to be humble about.

Related: “Why, given Thoreau’s hypocrisy, his sanctimony, his dour asceticism, and his scorn, do we continue to cherish ‘Walden’? One answer is that we read him early. ‘Walden’ is a staple of the high-school curriculum, and you could scarcely write a book more appealing to teen-agers: Thoreau endorses rebellion against societal norms, champions idleness over work, and gives his readers permission to ignore their elders. (‘Practically, the old have no very important advice to give the young, their own experience has been so partial, and their lives have been such miserable failures.’) ‘Walden’ is also fundamentally adolescent in tone: Thoreau shares the conviction, far more developmentally appropriate and forgivable in teens, that everyone else’s certainties are wrong while one’s own are unassailable. Moreover, he presents adulthood not as it is but as kids wishfully imagine it: an idyll of autonomy, unfettered by any civic or familial responsibilities.”

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