July 14, 2015

I SENSE A PATTERN HERE:

I’m Sorry — If Your Kids’ Lunches Look Like This, You’re Probably Creating Monsters: “Somewhere down the road, you’re going to have a daughter-in-law who hates you for spoiling her husband (your son) because he will enter their marriage expecting the same gourmet lunches with hand-carved Legos and smiley faces. And he’ll probably also leave his socks and underpants all over the house expecting her to pick up after him — because that’s what you always did for him.”

What Americans Lose When We Refuse Crap Jobs: “First, let us look at the social media fail of reporters that have seemingly never worked in food service. They have been mocking pictures of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker eating ribs while wearing latex gloves… I don’t know anything about the work experience of either reporter, but their apparent ignorance of basic food-safety regulations makes me wonder whether either has ever worked a crap job. Note to the national media: the people who make your food? They wear gloves. It’s for your benefit, not theirs.”

The doubts of a ‘Social Justice Warrior:’

A few weeks ago, I was heralded as a “Social Justice Warrior” by an anonymous commenter on the Internet. The title was meant, of course, as an insult — but I was elated.

I imagined myself as a superhero, fighting one stigma at a time until the United States became a land of truly equal opportunity.

I suppose I’d prefer to be a Social Justice Ninja, because “warrior” lacks the intrigue and mystery that I always try to emulate in my Cat Woman costume at Halloween.

Nonetheless, to him, I was a warrior for pushing a politically correct agenda by using rhetoric that wasn’t my own, but instead airy slogans right out of the leftist playbook.

I’m ashamed to admit it, but he was right.

I’m a rising junior at Columbia, one of the most PC universities in the country.

It’s one thing to have the already enormous self-esteem that all kids these seem to have drilled into them by their teachers since kindergarten. But if you imagine yourself a superhero ninja Catwoman comic book character while a student in college, it might be time for a wakeup call. (Otherwise, it will arrive good and hard when you enter the workforce.) To paraphrase the line from The Incredibles, if everyone thinks he’s a superhero, then no one is.

Or perhaps it’s gender-specific: while college-aged young women think of themselves as cartoon superheroes, college-aged men are allowed to deteriorate into beta males: “In less than 15 years, we’ve gone from ‘let’s roll’ to ‘let’s not get involved.’”

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