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Enough with This 'Spy Game'

If you're following Twitter, you've noticed a great deal of Democrat/Deep State chatter hinting darkly at Russian involvement in the election of Donald Trump, his business dealings with Putin's regime, and the alleged penetration of the administration by Russian agents or agents-of-influence. Now, one former spy has had enough:

According to former Vice President Biden, there’s been an on-going investigation into the alleged connections between Trump and Russia. All of us should take heart in knowing that the system is functioning exactly as designed.

However, some of America’s spies are deciding that that’s not enough. For reasons of misguided righteousness or partisan hatred, they’ve taken it upon themselves to be judge, jury, and executioner. They have prosecuted their case in the court of public opinion, with likeminded media outlets such as CNN, The New York Times, and the Washington Post serving as court stenographers.

Elected by no one, responsible only to each other, these spies have determined that Trump is guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors. Days ago, they delivered their verdict. According to one intelligence official, the president “will die in jail.”

 

As I wrote the other day, the Deep State empire of former Obama administration officials, former members of the intelligence community, and gullible reporters is trying to overturn the election and overthrow the government by peaceful means, via a whispering campaign, with sinister mutterings about "rumored Kremlin ties." That there's so far absolutely nothing to back it up hasn't seemed to dissuade them. But maybe it should:

In the culture of America’s spies, you live and die by a set of rules. One of them is a sacred pledge of allegiance to the constitution and commander in chief. Spies may not like a president or their policies but they must salute their leader nonetheless. If they cannot, they are told to resign.

Spies also take a vow of secrecy, specifically to keep classified information hidden from anyone who doesn’t have an authorized need to know. It’s a commitment one keeps for a lifetime. And should that vow be violated, the consequences are dire. Prison time. Colleagues and informants killed. Enemies emboldened. The country less safe.

Spies also accept and embrace a final rule: there must be an unbreakable wall between government workers and the democratic process. Why?

Because many spies have access to powerful tools that, if used improperly, could cause incredible damage to the nation’s stability. Accordingly, clandestine officers have a special covenant with the American people – codified by the Hatch Act – that limits their participation in politics.

During my time as a CIA officer, I quickly learned why all these rules were in place. I read people’s emails. I listened to phone calls. I recruited assets that told the dirtiest and most embarrassing of secrets. I came to realize that my power was both an awesome responsibility and, at times, wickedly seductive.

Some of us faltered in our commitments. I remember colleagues who believed themselves above the rules, conducting quiet investigations into cheating wives or ex-boyfriends. They were eventually discovered and rightfully thrown out. They had demonstrated an inability to handle the burden of power.

And that is precisely what we are experiencing today. The spies who are plotting against President Trump are breaking U.S. laws. They’re violating their oaths. And they’re committing treason to remedy (perceived) treason.

They likely don’t see it that way, of course. But, then again, neither did Aldrich Ames.