Get PJ Media on your Apple

VodkaPundit

Lost’d and Foundeth

April 23rd, 2014 - 1:35 pm

Shakespeare’s personal, annotated dictionary discovered?

If it’s real, it’s the literary find of the century. New York antiquarian booksellers Daniel Wechsler and George Koppelman believe they have found William Shakespeare’s annotated dictionary.

We know that Shakespeare had an eye out for unusual words – but we have only limited knowledge of where he went to find them.

The book itself is John Baret’s An Alvearie or Quadruple Dictionarie, published in 1580. It was listed on eBay in late April 2008. They placed a bid of $US4300 and got it for $US4050. Wechsler is unequivocal, “only $250 separated us from never having had this experience.”

I’ll be first in virtual line for the Kindle edition.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (3)
All Comments   (3)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
VP, kindle is $15. Cheap at twice the price.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
For sooth, I know not why this seems so awesome.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
Then may your blood flow out your veins and incarnadine the multitudinous seas.

ANNOTATED? By Will himself? That almost seems impossible. There's scarcely an authenticated signature of William Shakespeare. An annotated dictionary would be a gold mine considering the long-accepted belief -- now a debate -- about his prodigious vocabulary and inventiveness with language. Where did a tanner's son who knew "little Latin and less Greek" get such words as incarnadine, excellent, dwindle, submerge, jaded, fixture, elbow -- well, click here: http://www.shakespeare-online.com/biography/wordsinvented.html

Then there's the unique ways in which he used common words and his inventiveness with grammar.

Mind you I wouldn't want to be the graduate student picking over lemmas and headwords, but if this is the real thing then it may contain some cool insights into Shakespeare's unique uses of English.
21 weeks ago
21 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All