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VodkaPundit

Windows Everywhere-ish

March 4th, 2013 - 9:51 am

Windows 8 adoption frankly sucks:

The percentage of PCs in use worldwide running Microsoft’s Windows 8 operating system inched up to 2.7% in February, from 2.3% in January, according to Net Applications. Microsoft launched Windows 8 with a massive advertising campaign on Oct. 26.

Now four months after its launch, Windows 8 barely beats Apple’s Mac OS X 10.8 operating system, called Mountain Lion, which had 2.6% usage market share in February.

By comparison, its predecessor, Windows 7, had 9.1% global market share four months after its release, says Vince Vizzaccaro, executive vice president of marketing and strategic alliances for Net Applications.

When Windows 8 first rolled out last year, I was willing to cut the lousy adoption rate some slack. As I wrote back in October:

Windows Vista was so awful and Windows XP was so long in the tooth, that pent-up demand [may have] caused Windows 7 early installs to skyrocket. There’s no such pressure on people to upgrade early to Windows 8, because they’re pretty happy with 7 — which has only been around a couple of years.

That was my best of three guesses as to why early adopters were shunning the new OS, but months later that excuse is wearing a little thin. After all, new Windows computers drive a huge fraction of new OS installs, and Win8 was supposed to drive new computer sales.

But the sales never materialized. Not for Win8 desktops and laptops, not for Win8 semi-”Pro” tablets, and not for Windows RT tablets. I wouldn’t be surprised to read that the craptaculent Windows ME was adopted at a faster rate.

So what’s going on here?

First of all, the PC market is flat. Well, the Windows PC market is flat — Mac is still enjoying nice growth again, now that iMac supply constraints have been (mostly) fixed. But the explosive growth is all in mobile, where Microsoft is practically a no-show. Windows Phone 8 is good-but-ignored. Windows RT is a redheaded stepchild with a hairlip and a nasty disposition, and Win8 seems to be the semi-touch answer to the mouse-and-keyboard question nobody is asking.

Steve Ballmer has got to go.

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All Comments   (11)
All Comments   (11)
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I would say another point is that Win8's main new feature is the touch interface. Thing is, those who want a touch interface are getting a tablet (usually iPad) or using their smartphones. Even if Win8 worked perfectly, I doubt most regular Wintel users would want it. They're happy with their old school desktop box.

That's not to mention that -except for the MS Surface- there's darn few new systems being offered that feature a touchscreen.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Microsoft even made Windows 8 one of the cheapest OSs they have released (they were selling it for $40 I believe, and free upgrades for those who had purcahsed Win7 systems about a month before release).

There are a lot of ways to get around the annoyances of Windows 8 (shutdown/log off shortcuts, make metro one screen to avoid horizontal scrolling, use the task bar more etc.) but once you get around all those annoyances, it becomes a slightly better version of Windows 7 and that's it. No one's going to pay even $40 for what is almost what they already have.

The optimisation is probably the best feature in the entire thing but that would be better suited to a service pack. Service Packs are free. If someone got Windows 8 without charge, they would, as long as they got around the annoyances, most likely use it over Windows 7, but very few would actually pay for it, especially for a desktop.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Windows and Star Trek movies both follow the same rule. Every other release sucks. I didn't have to read a single review to know that Vista and 8 were going to suck.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm an IT manager and have been a professional PC geek since before years started with "2".

There are zero win8 PC's where I work, and probably won't be for a looooong time, if ever.

Win8 isn't a compelling upgrade, mostly because 7 was such a huge improvement, there wasn't far to go. Remember, Vista was so bad that MS didn't dare release 7 until it had been beta'd nigh unto death. Anybody could get free 7 upgrades to run until release, and MS listened very, very closely for problems. And fixed them. I seem to recall it was a freely downloadable beta for at least a year. Remember, most businesses upgraded from XP only because MS support was shutting off.

The intro of 8 is great, as the prices of 7's flavors have gone down as well. MS will be supporting 7 for a long, long time.

Now there is some good stuff in 8, especially the new storage setup, but it just isn't compelling enough.

Win8 is this this decade's "Windows ME". ME was an improvement over XP, but, like XPx64, just isn't well enough liked to get support, particularly when Win98 OSR2's equivalant, 7 is still going strong.

The Ubuntu geeks can think of 7 as a Long Term Release, and 8 as an intermediate point release. It isn't like any Fortune 500's are going to roll out 8 on existing boxes.

MS would sell a lot more OS bundled PC's if all licenses for 8 included "downgrade" rights to 7, like the Pro versions of Vista did. Meanwhile, the various Linuxes are having a bumper year, and competition is good for everybody. Even MS in the long run.

Unlike Steve, I'm a die-hard Linux fan who is coming around to MS's way of thinking, and scream at the gilded prison which is all things Apple. If it's any help, I'm getting the impression that Bill Gates is getting a bit unhappy with MS's decisions and becoming more active in managing MS again.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Most of our company is still on XP. and we're an MS Partner.

Most IT shops I've worked spend a bit of time testing before deciding to support a new OS. Then it's usually even longer before it makes an appearance.

Usually, that's with equipment refresh. And due to the crappy economy, refreshes are few and far between. So if we had a refresh, I guarantee the image they use on all the PCs would be that of Win 7.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
i set out to buy a new windows 8 machine in december. when i started to attempt to use it i changed my mind in less than 2 minutes. figuring that it was just me, i checked with the head librarian at the local library as to her exposure. she replied, " our tech guy says we don't want to be exposed."

1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Windows 8 showed me such a steep learning curve that I installed Linux Mint 14 on my old machine rather than buying a new one and I hate Linux. However it lets me get on the Internet and saved me the price of new machine and the price of a Windows 8 instruction book.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
One of Microsoft's core customer groups (enterprises) haven't had the time to transition to Win8 yet, so that may account for some of the numbers. Enterprises have a large install base and with custom apps, security, and certification being key, any large enterprise will take some time to approve the use of Win8. If Win8 doesn't look like an improvement then they won't jump and stick with previous versions.

Simple calculation: if Win8 won't work with vital business processes (and whatever apps are necessary) then it won't see deployment.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I was not too enthused by the Windows 8 intro last year, so I thought I would wait and see what the early adopters had to say. Early this year I saw an online video by a tech geek saying basically that Windows 8 SUCKS and to avoid it. Then to reinforce this, a friend of mine purchased a Win8 machine and asked me to help him get some programs, mostly photography related, from his old machine to the new one. After about 3 hours of frustration, we got some of the programs running, but the new interface made it a very trying experience. I wouldn't recommend Win8 for anyone. Hopefully, Microsoft will do something, or else my next machine will be a Mac.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Back in the '90s I was a big Microsoft guy, and an enthusiastic one. Gates & Co were able to do the completely necessary and the nearly impossible: Enforce compatibility on an industry that desperately needed it. The boost that gave our economy was incredible, and I was (and am) grateful.

To watch what has become of MS under Ballmer is sickening.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Ballmer is a business/law guy. Not a techie. That's the problem.

I figured they jumped the shark when Ray Ozzie left. They now have no "vision guy" of the Jobs/Gates/McNealy caliber.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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