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Apple Patent Verdict Fallout

August 27th, 2012 - 12:44 pm

Here’s Google’s statement, courtesy of The Verge:

The court of appeals will review both infringement and the validity of the patent claims. Most of these don’t relate to the core Android operating system, and several are being re-examined by the US Patent Office. The mobile industry is moving fast and all players — including newcomers — are building upon ideas that have been around for decades. We work with our partners to give consumers innovative and affordable products, and we don’t want anything to limit that.

Emphasis added. The “mosts of these” part a quiet admission by Google that, yes, Apple’s victory wasn’t just against Samsung, but against a couple key bits of “pure” Android.

9to5Mac reminds us:

To be clear, Nexus devices are Google devices manufactured by Samsung (or HTC or Acer) and loaded with the “Pure Google Android OS” without any Samsung Touchwiz overlay or carrier software.

Google’s Android OS, not just Samsung, was hit with two different patent infringement charges last week.

And then there’s another bit from Apple Insider:

Analysts on Wall Street reacted positively to the news that Apple had won its lawsuit against Samsung, proving to a jury that its rival was guilty of patent infringement. But though Apple was awarded over a billion dollars by the jury, market watchers believe the courtroom win could have ripple effects throughout the smartphone industry that would be in Apple’s favor.

Maynard Um with Wells Fargo Securities said in a note to investors on Monday that he believes the royalty revenue stream for Apple as a result of the ruling could be “highly profitable.” Apple must still win appeals from Samsung, and would need to be willing to settle future disputes.

Apple earning royalties off of Google’s “free” mobile OS? Sure. Microsoft already earns more money off of Android than it makes from licensing its own Windows Phone OS. That’s not saying much, as WP7 remains stalled, but it still helps prove Heinlein correct when he wrote that, “Anything free is worth what you pay for it.”

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