Get PJ Media on your Apple

The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

Bio

August 1, 2014 - 8:25 am

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention increased its travel warning for “the biggest and most complex Ebola outbreak in history” as the White House claimed it’s doing everything possible to protect American citizens.

National Security Council senior director for development and democracy Gayle Smith told reporters on an administration call previewing next week’s Africa leaders’ summit in Washington that the outbreak is “obviously… a great concern.”

“We have been engaged with and in the region in working on this issue since March, when the first cases appeared. Obviously, there has been a decline in a couple of countries so that there’s greater attention on it. We are closely engaged with the leaders and the governments of the three countries most affected,” Smith said.

“We’re doing several things. One is ramping up our efforts to support a regional effort to deal with this outbreak and support, again, three governments who are doing a lot of things to contend with a real threat. Mind you, these are countries that have emerged — particularly Sierra Leone and Liberia — from years of war.  And so this is an uphill challenge for them,” she continued. “We’re also taking the necessary steps domestically to protect the American people. We have no plans to change the agenda of the summit, but we will obviously adapt as needed and in consultation with our partners, depending on their requirements.”

The CDC said it’s “rapidly increasing its ongoing efforts” in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

“This is the biggest and most complex Ebola outbreak in history. Far too many lives have been lost already,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden in a statement. “It will take many months, and it won’t be easy, but Ebola can be stopped. We know what needs to be done. CDC is surging our response, sending 50 additional disease control experts to the region in the next 30 days.”

The precautions don’t include screening air passengers from affected countries.  ”It is important to note that Ebola is not contagious until symptoms appear, and that transmission is through direct contact of bodily fluids of an infected, symptomatic person or exposure to objects like needles that have been contaminated with infected secretions,” the CDC said.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf told CNN that the outbreak is “coming close to being a catastrophe.”

“We already have 300 persons in Liberia under surveillance, we have 47 deaths, 28 health workers dead, and I daresay it may be even greater in some of our other neighboring countries. This is very serious, it’s a disease that is unknown to us, it’s strange, it’s deadly, there’s no cure for it. Our people have at first — at — on the basis of no knowledge, resisted. The authorities deny today as people begin to die, we have — we are fearful, we are panicking, they are moving from one community to another,” said Sirleaf.

“We need everything. We need preventive gear, we need ambulances. More importantly, we need human assistance. We need technical assistance — doctors, nurses, experts that can train our own people as to how to deal with those who are sick, how we can encourage the preventive measures we are already taken — and we’ve taken a lot of them. We’ve quarantined places, we’ve closed schools, we’ve closed our borders, we’ve closed markets, we’ve done everything we can, but we’ve done is just not enough. What has happened in our sub region with our neighbors who have done a lot is still not enough. This is an international crisis and I hope that the international community will respond to it in that kind.”

White House press secretary Josh Earnest defended bringing at least one of two American aid workers stricken with Ebola back to the U.S. for treatment.

“These kinds of medevacs that are performed by private entities, by private organizations, yet facilitated by the U.S. government and government agencies, is consistent with what has been done in similar situations in the past,” Earnest said.

“In 2003, there were reports of American citizens overseas who contracted SARS. And the U.S. government facilitated the private transportation of those patients back to the U.S. so they could benefit from our modern medical infrastructure and have access to the kind of technology that could render lifesaving aid to them,” he added. “In 2007, there were Americans overseas who were at risk of contracting drug-resistant tuberculosis. Again, those individuals were transported through private means, but yet in a manner that was facilitated by the U.S. government, to return to the U.S. where they could get treatment.”

Bridget Johnson is a veteran journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She is an NPR contributor and has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (26)
All Comments   (26)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
What the experts tell us: The virus is only transmitted via contact with body fluids - blood, urine, saliva, feces - from someone showing symptoms of Ebola. In other words, don't worry about it!

The truth: Even experts can't tell if a person is infected, and the disease can spread without obvious contact with body fluids. That's because early symptoms are headaches and joint pains, so even experienced doctors are unaware they are coming into contact with the disease!

Sierra Leone's leading doctor in the fight against Ebola died. One of Liberia's top doctors died. Since then, more than 17 doctors in Liberia have died. The two Americans probably contracted the virus from a local worker.

The World Health Organization tells us that, "Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus through their semen for up to 7 weeks after recovery from illness". Can anyone say "air travel"?

The experts on TV are not telling us the full story! I wonder why? Like AIDS before it, Ebola will be the next big opportunity for the pharmaceutical and medical industries. Time for them to cash in!

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/01/us-health-ebola-healthworkers-idUSKBN0G14FR20140801
15 weeks ago
15 weeks ago Link To Comment
Is Ebola covered under Obamacare?
15 weeks ago
15 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why are these patients being brought into the U.S. when they could be isolated on hospital ships at sea?
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
The CDC was recently cited in a number of investigations for inadequate safeguards in handling highly infectious materials that could have expossed employees. How do we know that the CDC (a government entity) does not have the work ethic of the IRS, EPA, and VA? How do we know that this mega bureacracy has the judgement or should have the authority to expose millions of people who live in Atlanta to Ebola in order to save two lives? These are not questions which can be entrusted to some lazy ass liberal doctor with no experience in handling these kinds of trade offs. I am sick and tired of being treated as if we need let these incompetent fools lord over us
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
Facts on Ebola Transmission.
http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2014/08/ebola_important_facts_on_how_the_viral_disease_can_spread.html

PJMedia: I'd suggest a story be done providing a Primer with facts on this issue. Hollywood has given some really lurid fantasies. Ebola is a bit like AIDS, contagious but moderately hard to spread. You can give care with precautions rather than isolation, and it spreads as an STD a lot of the time.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
If an American is infected with a deadly disease overseas, and the infrastructure exists to safely repatriate them for treatment it is unconscionable not to do so. We all paid for this technology. We aren't subjects in some Third World sh!thole yet. This disease is survivable, and procedures exist to prevent its spread. Additionally, the more we know about treatment, the faster we can react when some idiot inevitably ships it across the ocean in a 777.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
If you think about it, an Ebola outbreak in the US is a perfect excuse for Obama to declare martial law and cancel all future elections.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
never let a crises go to waste ... hmmm what can do to get the next crises going, think harder, men, think harder, I need fresh ideas
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
People need to realize that the doctors and nurses working on this overseas are in impossible conditions working impossible hours. Their field hospitals are often tents, and the moonsuit gear often starts giving them heat exhaustion after only 15 or 20 minutes. Add to that they're working sometimes as many as 20 hours in a day, and they've been fighting this thing since late February/early March, and anyone would make mistakes. It's inevitable. I'm surprised more of them haven't gotten sick. You just can't keep a tent full of vomiting, bleeding people with diarrhea sanitary.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, absolutely correct. It's actually amazing how good they have done controlling the spread to health workers. It's also indicative of how difficult it is to spread (moderately difficult, but not as hard as we would prefer).
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
yup, right up until it doesn't, I mean until it does, how do you spell mutation ? actually, they should be sent to china, and put near a pig sty and a duck farm. tally ho !
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
As a F/U: http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/08/01/Ebola-Risk-From-Commonwealth-Games

Sierra Leone athletes don't want to go back to their native land so one has gone missing in Glasgow and the others are speaking out.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
Seems pretty reasonable to me.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
Leave ebola in Africa and MERS in the Middle East. They rejected colonialism at their peril.

Let Darwin cull the herds.
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
Not unless you ban planes trains and automobiles from those places....
16 weeks ago
16 weeks ago Link To Comment
1 2 Next View All