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The PJ Tatler

by
J. Christian Adams

Bio

June 11, 2014 - 3:43 am

You wondered how some would explain this whipping.  This morning I had a comment at a post saying Democrats crossing over to vote against Eric Cantor cost Cantor the election.  I assumed it was a unsophisticated crank posting, until I saw Twitter echoing the same excuse.

Guess what — the Democrat crossover excuse can be proven if the data are there.  Virginia keeps voter history data.  Some of you reading this already have it.  It is easy to tell if motivated Democrats were crossing over to vote in the GOP primary.  Decide how many Democrat primaries a voter must vote in to be a “Democrat” before crossing over yesterday.  Let’s assume it’s just one.

Cantor lost by 8,000 votes out of 65,000.  That’s a lot of crossing over.

If you are one of those trying to spin the Cantor loss as a plot by Democrats, you better have the data.  How many voters participated yesterday that previously participated in a single Democrat primary?  How many participated in two?  Three?  I suspect it wasn’t anywhere near 8,000.  I’d be surprised if it was more than 100.  But Team Brat doesn’t have the burden of proof on this narrative, does he?

Until someone pushing the crossover narrative shows us data, this was an epic whipping driven by issues, not by Democrats.

J. Christian Adams is an election lawyer who served in the Voting Rights Section at the U.S. Department of Justice. His New York Times bestselling book is Injustice: Exposing the Racial Agenda of the Obama Justice Department (Regnery).  His website is www.electionlawcenter.com. Follow him on Twitter @electionlawctr.

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Top Rated Comments   
If anything, I'd have been betting any Democrats crossing over would be trying to SAVE their collaborator from being whipped.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, if there is any truth at all to this particular narrative, then perhaps, finally, it would behoove the GOP to structure their primaries to make crossovers less likely to happen. Open primaries is one of the methods that help establishment Republicans prevent the Tea Party hordes from taking over. From the establishment viewpoint, Democratic crossover is a feature, not a bug. In fact, some of the GOP candidates were openly inviting crossover in order to defeat the evil Tea Party.

So in this one isolated incident, the crossover hurt them? Doubtful. But the GOP establishment will say and do anything to put the lid on the Tea Party insurrection.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (20)
All Comments   (20)
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Many Americans are witnessing an invasion from south of the border, and they regard people like Cantor, who are not just letting it happen but abetting it, as traitors. The denizens of D.C., City of Thieves, who are helping the invaders, belong in Gitmo, and Gitmo should be moved to northern Alaska.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Dem crossover voting only makes sense in a primary where they are fielding a strong candidate and don't need the primary votes, but want to ensure that the Republicans run the weakest possible candidate, or upset a stronger Republican. Well guess what? Dem crossover makes NO sense in this particular primary because the Dems were sitting this one out! There WAS no Dem candidate yesterday, nor will there be one in November - unless they manage to circumvent election law to do it, or find some massively awesome leftie like George Clooney to run as a write-in candidate. So for all intents and purposes, the VA 7 election was decided yesterday. Even the Dems thought Cantor was unbeatable! Perhaps what is more likely here is that Cantor and his supporters were so smug and sure of victory that a lot of them decided not to go out in the rain to vote.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Mr. Adams:

Are their restrictions on cross-party participation in party runoff elections. This seems like a good application for "purple thumb or barcode stubs to be used to limit voting to those who voted in the first round. I could see Cochran in Mississippi getting Dems out to vote for him 2 weeks from now.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Of course there are. Under MS law, a Democrat who voted in the Democrat primary may not vote in the Republican runoff. The scenario you describe is a non-issue in Mississippi.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
You say that, and yet...

http://www.fairvote.org/research-and-analysis/presidential-elections/congressional-and-presidential-primaries-open-closed-semi-closed-and-top-two/

...in some states, one party has an open primary while another has a closed primary; or one is open and the other semi-open; and etc.

E.g., California: Closed for Republicans; semi-closed for Democrats.
E.g., Hawaii: Open for Republicans; closed for Democrats.

*Something* is complicated. If the same statutes apply to both (or any party) then how is this possible?

BTW... not trying to be difficult, at least not on purpose. I agree with your article.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Cantor lost by 8,000 out of about 400,000, the turnout was about 15%.

Here in Los Angeles the primary we just had turned out a big 10%, and it let a Jewish Republican (Elan Carr) win the most votes, which means he will appear on the ballot of the general election, against a local Democrat (for retiring Henry Waxman's old seat). All the press is saying this is just an artifact of the open primary system, much like in Cantor's district. Is it really? Time will tell.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
As of this morning, Elan Carr should be the recipient of a lot of accolade and funds that now have nowhere to go.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
it would seem that a republican primary should be for republcans, as is a democrat party primary for democrats.


Or do away with the primary and try what Cal. did. Open primary and top 2, no matter what party face off in the general election. so 5 republicans split the vote and none wind up in the general election.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
I agree with you about party primaries being open only to members of that party. My husband, who is a rabid, yellow-dog Democrat, crosses over and votes in Republican primaries because he "likes to mess with the Repubs." Of course, the joke is on him, because for two years after he does this, he is bombarded with Republican literature in the mail and tons of fundraising calls from Republican candidates. This makes him furious! I keep telling him, "Vote in your own primary and this won't happen!"
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
run on conservative ideas win on conservative ideas.


Ignore the media that wants to define you, win
Ignore the media that never likes conservatives, run like a Reagan win


Seems simple enough, if pols would stop reading how to win, by people who want their policies defeated.


But last I read, politics is a blood sport, and to defeat the harry reids, pelosis and BO's you have to stand tall, give a reason to vote for you, and realize that despite the media this country is conservative leaning.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
I read the comment in the earlier post as a question, not a statement.

I don't follow Twitter, so I don't know who said what.

But if we are going to debunk narratives we should do so fairly. The question, if innocent and sincere did not deserve false attribution. We're better than that here.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
The same set of statutes DO govern both in all cases. This isn't complicated stuff.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
> They are a function of state statute.

Who writes the state statutes?
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
The Virginia General Assembly. That means Democrats and Republicans write the rules as legislators, not as party officials. Big difference. Bottom line: in the Commonwealth - the Virginia Republican Party has no say in how to "structure their primary's." It is an open primary pursuant to state law, not VAGOP by-laws.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
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