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by
Rick Moran

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May 31, 2014 - 10:30 am

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the only US POW believed to be held by the Taliban, was freed by his captors in exchange for give Guantanamo detainees, the Associated Press is reporting:

The officials said the Taliban agreed to turn over Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in exchange for the release of five Afghan detainees from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The transfers happened after a week of intense negotiations mediated by the government of Qatar, which will take custody of the Afghans.

In a statement, President Barack Obama said Bergdahl’s recovery “is a reminder of America’s unwavering commitment to leave no man or woman in uniform behind on the battlefield.”

Officials said the Taliban turned the 28-year-old Bergdahl over Saturday evening, local time, in Afghanistan. Several dozen U.S. special forces were involved in the exchange, which took place in eastern Afghanistan, near the Pakistani border.

Officials described the transfer as a nonviolent handover between the American forces and about 18 Taliban.

Bergdahl was in good condition and able to walk, according to the officials, who insisted on anonymity in order to describe the details of his release.

Bergdahl is expected to be transferred to Bagram Air Field, the main U.S. base in Afghanistan, then on to the United States.

Bergdahl, of Hailey, Idaho, had been held by the Taliban since June 30, 2009. He is thought to have been captured by members of the Haqqani network, which operates in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border region and has been one of the deadliest threats to U.S. troops in the war.

The Haqqani network, which the State Department designated as a foreign terrorist organization in 2012, claims allegiance to the Afghan Taliban, yet operates with some degree of autonomy.

PJ Media Washington Editor Bridget Johnson highlighted the plight of Bergdahl earlier this year as part of the Yellow Ribbon Project, which seeks to keep the names of Americans held overseas before the public until they are brought home.

Controversy has surrounded Bergdhal since his capture. Did he walk away from his post and desert? Emails to his parents just prior to his capture indicate he was “disillusioned” with America and thought about deserting. His emails home were full of details about the extreme dysfunction of his unit and how he felt he had been lied to by the military.

The emails, published by Rolling Stone in a 2012 article, read as if Bergdhal was ready to go over the wall:

The Rolling Stone article, to be published Friday, also quotes other soldiers and associates of Bergdahl’s as saying that he had talked about walking to Pakistan if his deployment was “lame” and that shortly before his disappearance he had asked whether he should take his weapon if he left the base. Friends and other soldiers describe a survivalist mentality, and Bergdahl’s father, Bob, told the magazine that his son was “living in a novel.”

“The future is too good to waste on lies,” one email reads. “And life is way too short to care for the damnation of others, as well as to spend it helping fools with their ideas that are wrong.”

The emails were provided to the magazine by Bergdahl’s family in Idaho, which has gone public with its own discontent with U.S. efforts to free their son. There is no way to authenticate the emails.

Some of Bergdahl’s reported words read like a suicide note.

“I am sorry for everything,” he wrote. “The horror that is America is disgusting.”

He mailed home boxes containing his uniform and books.

Bergdhal made several propaganda videos, but the military usually doesn’t hold that against a returning POW. More problematic will be his debriefing where he will almost certainly be asked about the circumstances surrounding his capture. After telling his parents he was “ashamed to even be an American,” Sgt. Bergdhal will have a lot of explaining to do.

Rick Moran is PJ Media's Chicago editor and Blog editor at The American Thinker. He is also host of the"RINO Hour of Power" on Blog Talk Radio. His own blog is Right Wing Nut House.
Top Rated Comments   
Oh for God's sake read the damn emails. He is probably - almost certainly a deserter. Yeah - from that bastion of right wing lunacy The Rolling Stone!.

Sheesh,
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
In a statement, President Barack Obama said Bergdahl’s recovery “is a reminder of America’s unwavering commitment to leave no man or woman in uniform behind on the battlefield.”

What an unmitigated load of crap! Does he think people will not remember those four dead men in Benghazi?
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
"In a statement, President Barack Obama said Bergdahl’s recovery “is a reminder of America’s unwavering commitment to leave no man or woman in uniform behind on the battlefield.”

Tell that to the 4 dead Americans you'll left behind in Benghazi.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (32)
All Comments   (32)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Homeland" is the first thing that came to mind when I learned of this story.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Greetings:


For a while now, the “Leave No Man Behind” (LNMB) concept has been a bit of a burr under my cerebral saddle. It seems to have a great deal of resonance, especially with military and former military webizens. Recently, I re-read Mark Bowden’s “Black Hawk Down” about the “Battle of the Black Sea” in Mogadishu, Somalia in the early part of President Clinton’s first term and that reading brought forward in what’s left of my mind a concern about what’s involved in that concept and its implications for today’s soldiers.

Admittedly, it has been a long time since my military service. That was back when the draft didn’t have anything to do with ventilation. So, I have no direct experience of today’s volunteer military. But, be that as it may, I am concerned that LNMB seems to be progressing from a mantra to something approaching a fetish and I worry about its impact on our troops.

When I went off to see what kind of an infantryman I could be, dying wasn’t my largest fear. My father had survived his infantry stint in WW II and I fancied myself as good a man as he. And, as a twenty year old, my sense of mortality was in its earliest stage of development. My greatest fear, by far, was being crippled. Secondarily, it was failing in my duties. Subsequently, when I became a squad leader, which was somewhat after I was made a squad leader, I bumped up against the LNMB concept big time. And it’s the resonance of that emotional experience that has me concerned.

Even at the mantra end of the spectrum, LNMB seems so terse as to be almost mindless. I have to wonder if there is some super-secret calculus that I failed to apprehend. I mean, are our troops all committed to dying lest one get left behind? While “Black Hawk Down” may be the exception rather than the rule, my take on it is that its “Lost Convoy” is an adequate example as to how very wrong military thinking can go when it is overly influenced by such thinking.

(For those unfamiliar with “Black Hawk Down”, the “Lost Convoy” was supposed to remove the American soldiers from Mogadishu after their raid. When the first Black Hawk was shot down, the convoy was diverted to the crash site and was exposed to heavy enemy fire while trying to follow radio directions. It ended up returning to base without ever reaching the crash site but with very heavy casualties.)

At the other end of the spectrum and in spite of all the technology, efforts, and bravery, American soldiers were tragically left behind at the second helicopter crash site.

Thus the crux of my concern, has LNMB become some kind of unit macho fetish as opposed to say, and this will sound trite, an organizational goal? Has it become a too easy answer to too difficult problems? Are we setting our soldiers up for failure or worse by allowing LNMB too much of their and their superiors mindshare. Hopefully, nobody wants to leave anyone behind but nobody wants their soldiers killed or wounded either. Isn’t more complex thinking better than relying on slogans?
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
This is a very thoughtful commentary. I believe a lot of it has to do with service or MOS culture. Not having served in USMC or USA, I will leave it to them to comment. In Naval Aviation, we always knew if we were shot down that the air wing would do what could be done to get us (and that was quite a lot), but we also knew that did not mean ridiculous blind sacrifice. Certainly the knowledge that your brothers would go all out, inculcated the same passion in yourself, and increased the cohesion, resilience and combat lethality of the air wing. But sometimes "going all out" is required of the stranded survivor to endure captivity or death, in order to preserve the liives of his fellow warriors.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Not to speak ill of people who have been held hostage for five years, but when I saw his picture in the news, it struck me that something was missing in his eyes - a sense of spirit and pride even in the most oppressive circumstances. If this is true, that would explain it.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
From the AP: "Officials said the Taliban turned the 28-year-old Bergdahl over Saturday evening, local time, in Afghanistan. Several dozen U.S. special forces were involved in the exchange, which took place in eastern Afghanistan, near the Pakistani border."

I hear they weren't Special Forces at all. I heard they were Seals. The transfer must have been made at sea.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Reporters don't know the difference. For them, any elite unit is "special forces".

Note they did not capitalize the term.


So, it may well have been SEALS (note the proper capitalization).

7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
There should be an /s after 'sea.'
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
if the news reports are right, we get one America-hater (who likely deserted) and the Taliban gets five hardcore guerrillas. Brilliant.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
This fits in with the typical D'oh-bama methodology. Everything this collection of socialists has done has an element of slightly "gray area" where there's something that's relatively unprovable, provided the right people say the right things.

In the weeks to come, Bergdhal's daddy will have been given the opportunity to blather about how he was against (or for) his son's enlistment, but after reading his (deeply heartening) emails, came to wish his son had never done so....that he was in the "wrong war" run by the "wrong people" and all the other socialist-supporting taglines to make us vomit.

Then the perp himself will speak and give the msm mouth-gasms to parrot his desires for "peace in the world" and "can't we all just get along".

And, left untended is the argument, a very serious argument, that this adult raised his hand and agreed to "follow the orders of the officers appointed over me".

He was in the US Army. It's not a mystery what they do, in spite of the TV spots where they go put out forest fires and rescue Fluffy from a flood these days; Their job is to kill people and break things. Jeez....war movies have been on TV since long before this idiot was alive. What did he think he was going to do in the Army?

Wear pajamas and drink hot cocoa?

*sigh*

So he waddled off post and into the hands of the enemy---willingly, I might add.

That is desertion. It's clearly defined by the UCMJ.

It is still punishable by execution---and should be.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Wow. Bergdahl released, Ibrahim released. Oh happy day.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Glad for the POW, welcome home (I think). Let's hope that we have digitally "marked" the Gitmo guests so they can be "droned home".
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
And the hand over was nonviolent, why?

Why hand over live ones? Well, because we won't kill them. But why hand over ones who haven't been implanted with transponders and then greeted with Hellfire?
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
American soldier comes home after 5 years as a POW. What's PJM's response? #Benghazi!! and insinuating that the soldier is a traitor.

Because of course it is.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Never let the facts get in the way of a good narrative, eh NY?


But then, that's standard procedure for a leftist.

7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
There are no facts yet, just people conjecturing based on some emails. Maybe you need to refresh yourself on the difference between facts and opinions. Those seem to get confused around here a lot.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
The facts are the emails, which legitimately raise questions which demand answers.

Ignoring facts is the stock-in-trade of the left.

7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Oh for God's sake read the damn emails. He is probably - almost certainly a deserter. Yeah - from that bastion of right wing lunacy The Rolling Stone!.

Sheesh,
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Oh for God's sake read the damn emails. He is probably - almost certainly a deserter"

So say all the mil bloggers today. And they ain't happy about the transfer one dang bit.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
Innocent until proven guilty, or is that not a principle you hold dear?
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
This administration has been proven guilty time and time again.

As for Bergdahl, we may never know. If he is a deserter, it would not serve this administration's purposes for that to become known, ergo, it won't likely be aired in any court, and the story will be buried.

7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
You tell it, Rick.
7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment

7 weeks ago
7 weeks ago Link To Comment
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